Appoggiatura


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Related to Appoggiatura: acciaccatura

Appoggiatura

 

(German Vorschlag), a melisma (seeORNAMENTATION) consisting of one or two notes that precede a main note in the melody. Appoggiaturas appear on the staff as small notes. The short appoggiatura (Appoggiatura) derives its value from the preceding note in the melody. The long appoggiatura, notated without the cross stroke, derives its value from the main note.

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The first measure of the fourth piece [Le Verbe]: an enlarged appoggiatura of the ff pedal theme at the beginning of this same piece: an enlarged appoggiatura on G." Translation in Holloway, "Organ Works," 477.
Sacred oratorio maintained a degree of improvisational freedom throughout the latter half of the nineteenth century, enabling singers the scope to ornament melodic lines with an elaborate vocabulary of passing tones, turns, trills, appoggiaturas and other filigree.
The people of this stanza--mother, children, the subject of the last sentence--are very different from the unsituated "they" of its beginning or from Everyman leaning, like an appoggiatura, on the world.
Bach's rules for the duration of an appoggiatura before a dotted note.(16)
The descending semitone appoggiatura C over A[sharp] in measure 4 creates the intervals of a whole step and then a half step.
When Mackerras complained that there was "not one damn appoggiatura the whole evening," the reply was, "Herr Mackerras ...
Byrd eschews a full close on A with an evasive cadence above which the b', serving as an appoggiatura to the a', is flattened to mitigate the tritone which would otherwise have arisen with the bass f; the harsh dissonance this creates with the a in the left hand is another contributing factor to the overall effect.
1 of BWV 1001: the slur in the second beat is obviously too short, and should cover the whole group to the end of the beat; and there is a slur missing from the 7-6 appoggiatura in the third beat.
IN AUTHORITATIVE MODERN EDITIONS of eighteenth century operas, it is commonplace to see many editorial cues inserted into recitatives to change the penultimate note of a repeated note feminine line ending to an appoggiatura. For example, nearly all of those in Christoph Willibald Gluck's Orfeo ed Euridice have an editorial appoggiatura added above the staff, as in the recitative "Ecco un nuovo tormento!", which has six instances in four measures (Example 1).
To mention a few, what features of notation should be normalized and why; what is the true difference between appoggiatura and acciaccatwra in this music or, generally speaking, how should ornaments be transcribed in modern notation; and what are the possibly different meanings of the wavy line used to notate portalo and the series of dotted notes joined by a slur.
Appoggiatura, James Still; music: Michael Keck; dir: Risa Brainin.