Appoggiatura

(redirected from Appoggiaturas)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to Appoggiaturas: acciaccaturas

Appoggiatura

 

(German Vorschlag), a melisma (seeORNAMENTATION) consisting of one or two notes that precede a main note in the melody. Appoggiaturas appear on the staff as small notes. The short appoggiatura (Appoggiatura) derives its value from the preceding note in the melody. The long appoggiatura, notated without the cross stroke, derives its value from the main note.

Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
(27.) The relationship of the final G to the appoggiaturas is seen in greater clarity when the entirety of the first part of the piece is considered: the first part of the piece, as previously noted, lasts four minutes and eleven seconds in Messiaen's performance--the only essential note is played for only twenty-one seconds.
Improvisatory vocal techniques that incorporated the portamento, appoggiatura, falsetto, turns, passing notes, as well as other ornamental devices were amongst the singer's repertoire of 'special effects' used in the 'lining-out' process.
As Polly pleads for her life in stanza 7 the fiddle recalls the transposed fragments and appoggiaturas of stanza 5 but this time adds a double-stop at the interval of a seventh, heightening the tension.
Such a pursuit is very different from the echoing of Stevens in Ashbery mentioned above, or even Ashbery's echoing of William Cowper's long "wandering" poem, The Task; (26) such echoing functions as a grace note or even the leaning appoggiatura. That is, the musical modality Ashbery announces here at the beginning of The Double Dream of Spring pursues layering and cycle, grace notes instead of harmony: the pattern of beginning again and returning to the point of origin, is graced and inflected by the cycle of the natural day in the second stanza, a double dream (so to speak) of experience.
Which will be expressed by melodic and harmonic means: the progressive growth of intervals, the chord on the dominant, ostinatos, grace notes, and extended appoggiaturas. Still more by rhythmic means: rhythms immediately preceded or followed by their augmentation and sometimes lengthened by an added value....
In the introduction Montgeroult mentions a type of ornament that she calls appoggiaturas,
In 'Dove sei?' (HG 81) Handel conveys both Ottone's despair and his anxious longing for Teofane through the falling phrases in the vocal line, which fluctuates between smooth and dotted rhythms, and through the dotted and always descending figure and the suspensions and appoggiaturas that are prominent throughout in the orchestra.
The treble part, on the other hand, is normally fairly heavily decorated with a variety of such specific ornaments (trills, turns, mordents and appoggiaturas) as are characteristic of keyboard music in general.
Omitting the anacrustic sixteenths and the appoggiaturas on the downbeats of bars 2-4, and adjoining the high "C" from the beginning of the next phrase, yields level i, where interval 5 (descending thirds/ascending sixths) is presented in the form of four successive melodic "chords of the sixth," the first and second related conjunctly, the second and third related disjunctly, the third and fourth related again conjunctly.
The appoggiaturas proposed for feminine line endings are said to be necessary for prosodic reasons and so do not count as an ornament.
In the 1950s, Mackerras was an early adopter of eighteenth-century vocal ornamentation (notably appoggiaturas), a practice that was not widely accepted at that time.
One common trait of Oriental melodies is the almost obsessive repetition of a single note, colored by appoggiaturas above and below it, creating a kind of "incantation." Additionally, cante jondo usually consists of descending melody lines ending on a falling cadence of a minor second, such as is found in the phrygian mode.