Absyrtus

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Absyrtus

hacked to death; body pieces strewn about. [Gk. Myth.: Walsh Classical, 3]
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At home she rouses her brother Apsyrtus; both return to the temple.
She does not, of course, kill her brother Apsyrtus; instead, the two have a tender farewell scene.
According to a Greek myth, the islands were born out of the severed body of Absyrtus (or Apsyrtus) scattered into the sea by his sister Medea.
(10) According to another version of the myth, Medea trapped and murdered Absyrtus (Apsyrtus) on one of the Illyrian islands henceforth called Absyrtides (Graves, 603-6).
In particular, Medea's gruesome treatment of her adolescent brother, Apsyrtus, encapsulates her more general rejection of the basic ties of human attachment for the sake of the mission set out by Jason.
This thesis, later published as Creative selectivity in Apollonius' Argonautika (1993), investigates the reasons why Apollonius chose to follow one mythological tradition rather than another in constructing his epic poem (he emphasizes the erotic aspects of Jason's visit to Lemnos, for example, and omits other versions) and shows that the poet was not afraid to innovate where this suited his purpose (for example, Apollonius is the first poet to portray Apsyrtus as an adult -- Why?).
First, as in Corymbus' case, both Manto's and Apsyrtus' revenge against the protagonists is described with the noun xiutopia and the verb xiutopeoum (147) and Habrocomes' possible refusal is seen by Manto as an act of wteprippavia.
It was perhaps to prevent the dead man from summoning the Furies that a murderer sucked and spat out his victim's blood three times, which is what Jason does to the body of his victim Apsyrtus, as Apollonius of Rhodes describes in The Voyage of the Argo Book IV.
He further demonstrates his dominance over the narrative by mentioning a subject that Medea leaves out: Apsyrtus' murder ([GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], 4.736-7).
1.742 [GREEK TEXT OMITTED]; not only will Ariadne's departure with Theseus be used in the seduction of Medea later on in the poem, but a cloak, used by Dionysus and Ariadne, which was passed down to Hypsipyle and given to Jason, will be used to trick Apsyrtus (65).
Falling in love with Jason, Medea helped him to steal the Golden Fleece and to murder her half brother Apsyrtus to delay their pursuers.
The Argonauts were pursued but escaped again, when Jason and Medea treacherously slew her half - brother Apsyrtus and (according to some versions) flung pieces of his body from the ship.