Apulia

(redirected from Apulian)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

Apulia

(əpyo͞o`lēə), Ital. Puglia, region (1991 pop. 4,031,885), 7,469 sq mi (19,345 sq km), S Italy, bordering on the Adriatic Sea in the east and the Strait of Otranto and Gulf of Taranto in the south. Its southern portion, a peninsula, forms the heel of the Italian "boot." BariBari
, city (1991 pop. 342,309), capital of Bari prov. and of Apulia, S Italy, on the Adriatic Sea. It is a major seaport and an industrial and commercial center. It is connected by road, rail, and ship to other Adriatic ports and is now connected by road to Naples.
..... Click the link for more information.
 is the capital of the region, which is divided into Bari, Brindisi, Foggia, Lecce, and Taranto provs. (named for their capitals). Apulia is mostly a plain; its low coast, however, is broken by the mountainous Garagano Peninsula in the north, and there are mountains in the north central part of the region. Farming was the chief occupation, but industry has expanded rapidly. Farm products include olives, grapes, cereals, almonds, figs, tobacco, and livestock (sheep, pigs, cattle, and goats). Manufactures include refined petroleum, chemicals, cement, iron and steel, processed food, plastics, and wine. Fishing is pursued in the Adriatic and in the Gulf of Taranto. The scarcity of water has long been an acute problem in Apulia, and it is necessary to carry drinking water by aqueduct across the Apennines from the Sele River in Campania. In ancient times only the northern part of the region was called Apulia; the southern peninsula was known as Calabria, a name later used to designate the toe of the Italian boot. The region was settled by several Italic peoples and by Greek colonists before it was conquered (4th cent. B.C.) by Rome. After the fall of Rome, Apulia was held successively by the Goths, the Lombards, and the Byzantines. In the 11th cent. it was conquered by the Normans; Robert GuiscardRobert Guiscard
, c.1015–1085, Norman conqueror of S Italy, a son of Tancred de Hauteville (see Normans). Robert joined (c.1046) his brothers in S Italy and fought with them to expel the Byzantines.
..... Click the link for more information.
 set up the duchy of Apulia in 1059. After the Norman conquest of Sicily (late 11th cent.), Palermo replaced MelfiMelfi
, town (1991 pop. 15,757), in Basilicata, S Italy. It is an agricultural and tourist center noted for its wine. In 1041 it was made the first capital of the Norman county of Apulia. At Melfi Emperor Frederick II promulgated (c.
..... Click the link for more information.
 (just west of present-day Apulia) as the center of Norman power, and Apulia became a mere province, first of the kingdom of Sicily, then of the kingdom of Naples. From the late 12th to early 13th cent. Apulia was a favorite residence of the Hohenstaufen emperors, notably Frederick II. The coast later was occupied at times by the Turks and by the Venetians. In 1861 the region joined Italy. The feudal system long prevailed in the rural areas of Apulia; social and agrarian reforms proceeded slowly from the 19th cent. and accelerated in the mid-20th cent. The characteristic Apulian architecture of the 11th–13th cent. reflects Greek, Arab, Norman, and Pisan influences. There are universities at Bari and Lecce.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

Apulia

a region of SE Italy, on the Adriatic. Capital: Bari. Pop.: 4 023 957 (2003 est.). Area: 19 223 sq. km (7422 sq. miles)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The Apulian take on an Italian classic, seafood with a bread and pecorino filling, poached then fried.
These carbonate platforms tectonically overlay a pile of Mesozoic-Tertiary pelagic basin successions belonging to the Lagonegro unit, Neogene flysch deposits, and shallow-water and slope facies carbonates of the Apulian Platform ([40-43] and references therein).
Go ahead, you who know, you who can, you who will see Don't abandon us, you who know, you who can, you who will see Well, II mondo magico (this became clear to me only later) was nothing other than a contemplation, at the global level, of the obscure theogonie anguish perennially pressing on the gaze of poor Apulian peasants.
(7.) The parents' regional origins for the second-generation writers are Sicilian (7), Neapolitan (3), Calabrese (3), Roman (3), Apulian (2), Ligurian (1), with 10 parents of mixed regional or national ancestries (one each from Sicily, Puglia, Basilicata, Calabria, Campania, Lazio, Emilia-Romagna, Lombardy, Ireland and Argentina).
In the last few years, Apulian universities have been making great efforts to promote technology transfer, although they are operating within an organizational, financial and legal context not so much developed yet and often changing.
Moretti, "Soft-sediment deformation structures interpreted as seismites in middle-late Pleistocene aeolian deposits (Apulian foreland, southern Italy)," Sedimentary Geology, vol.
Vetrano et al., "Exploitation of autochthonous micro-organism potential to enhance the quality of Apulian wines," Annals of Microbiology, vol.
The circular, cylindrical forms bring to mind traditional Italian Apulian trulli, Neolithic British Pimperne roundhouses and historical tulou of Hakka people in southern China.
Phillips connects the different types of frescoes in Pompeii to the examples found in Apulian vases, showing how the Tarentine masters of the fourth century BC were the ones who produced the main innovations in Andromeda's iconography, namely the shift from the posts to the grotto, and finally to the rocky cliff.
Of the known 13,631 Apulian red-figure vases from Italy, only a little over 5 per cent were recovered archaeologically and it is estimated that tens of thousands of ancient tombs were plundered to produce so many vases.
The report says: "Both Camorra (Naples) and Apulian (Puglia) crime groups have established extensive links with Chinese groups to distribute counterfeit products such as software, CDs, movies and luxury goods." More dangerous is the explosion in synthetic drugs, such as amphetamines and methamphetamine, and fake pharmaceutical products made in China, Hong Kong, India, Thailand and Turkey.
A second association of tortoises with young girls comes from vase depictions A fourth-century Apulian vase (khous), now in the British Museum, is illuminating.