Aquamanile


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Aquamanile

 

an ancient vessel for holding water, a table washstand.

Aquamaniles have been known since ancient times and were widely used in the Middle Ages (in ancient Russia, Western Europe, and the Orient). They were made of bronze or clay, usually in the shape of an animal, bird, or horseman.

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A beautiful late 13th to 14th century aquamanile from the Cwm Nant hoard,found near Llanbedr in 1918, which is going on show in Cardiff: organisers want to talk to the descendants of the finder to discover more about the find
Dating directly from the Middle Ages is a group of no less inventive aquamaniles at Christie's London.
A 13th or 14th Century 'aquamanile' (pictured) which would have been used for holding liquid in hand-washing ceremonies.
While a 13th-century bronze aquamanile in the form of a standing lion doubled expectations at Artcurial, it was a 12th-century German aquamanile in the far less common form of a dragon or griffin that attracted most attention at Christie's London on 2 December, in the firm's first stand-alone sculpture sale for over a decade.
S&J Stodel offers Chinese export silver vessels, Robert Kleiner Chinese jade snuff bottles and Amir Mohtashemi, the likes of a Deccan brass zoomorphic aquamanile in the shape of a peacock (18th century).
Other highlights range from a stately 13thcentury bronze aquamanile in the form of a lion (estimate 200,000[pounds sterling]-300,000[pounds sterling]) to an early--and unique--twisted and bent iron piece by Eduardo Chillida entitled Katezale (Enchained).