Aquileia


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Aquileia

(äkwēlĕ`yä), town, in Friuli–Venezia Giulia, NE Italy, near the Adriatic Sea. Founded in 181 B.C. by the Romans, it was a stronghold against the barbarians and a trade center. Later, the town was destroyed several times by invaders, notably by Attila (A.D. 452). In the 6th cent. Aquileia became the see of a patriarch. Fleeing the Lombards in 568, the patriarch took refuge in Grado, the island port of Aquileia, and remained there while Aquileia elected its own patriarch. The pope recognized (7th cent.) both patriarchates; in 1445 that of Grado was transferred to Venice. From the 11th cent. Aquileia flourished under the temporal rule of its patriarchs, who acquired Friuli, Carniola, and Istria. Decline began in the 14th cent., and in 1420 Venice occupied Aquileia and Friuli. Aquileia was under Austrian rule from 1509 to 1918, when it passed to Italy. The patriarchate was abolished in 1751. Of particular note is the Romanesque basilica (11th cent., partly restored in the 14th cent.), with a well-preserved mosaic floor and frescoes of the 12th and 13th cent. There are also Roman ruins and an archaeological museum.
References in periodicals archive ?
735-804), Paschasius Radbertus (785-865), Amalarius of Metz (780-850), Paulinus II of Aquileia (ca.
(41) See also the account in Rufinus of Aquileia Hist.
In the following quote, for instance, the author describes the past of Aquileia:
The annual Carnival of Venice dates back to the mid-12th century to mark the victory of the "Serenissima Repubblica" against the Patriarch of Aquileia, Ulrico di Treven.
Herodian composed his Roman history in the middle of the third century, a culminating event of which is the siege of the northern Italian city of Aquileia by the forces of the emperor Maximinus in 238.
Son dos los pasos del Decretum que atraen la atencion y que incluyen dos cartas pontificias, las cuales en orden cronologico resultan ser la primera del Papa Inocencio l dirigido a Probo, de dudosa fecha (76); la segunda del Papa Leone l destinada al Obispo de Aquileia y de fecha del 458 (77).
Although some were sentenced to prison or to the galleys, most were given spiritual sentences: pilgrimages, penances, prayers, etc." Asked about the punishment used by Inquisitions in other countries, Borromeo said that "between 1551 and 1647, it [sic] Italian court of Aquileia condemned only 0.5% of accused to death.