Aquitanian


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Aquitanian

[‚ak·wə′tān·ē·ən]
(geology)
Lower lower Miocene or uppermost Oligocene geologic time.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
This event took place around the early Miocene (Aquitanian) and in the boundary of the Asmari and Gachsaran formations.
For example, Keyser's statement that the origin of' the music of troubadour song is enigmatic is certainly arguable, but should be read against Margaret Switten's convincing study of the influence of the Aquitanian versus on the melodies of troubadour song ("Versus and Troubadours Around 1100: A Comparative Study of Refrain: Technique in the New Song,' " Plainsong and Medieval Music 16 [2007]: 91143).
There are only three solo roles, the Aquitanian troubadour Jaufre Rudel, the Tnpolitanian Countess Clemence and the enigmatic Pilgrim who acts as their go-between, played respectively and superbly by baritone Russell Braun, soprano Erin Wall and mezzo Krisztina Szabo.
Knox (2005) offers a reconsideration of the book's publication date and places it in mid-to late 29 B.C.E., that is, in the year after the Aquitanian campaign.
The first extant generations moved in the spheres of the learned Aquitanian courts and of musical monasteries such as Saint Martial de Limoges.
(17) See Charlotte Diane Roederer, "Eleventh-century Aquitanian Chant: Studies Relating to a Local Repertory of Processional Antiphons," 2 vols.
Their topics include the offertory/response Recordare mei Domine, problems of pitch level and modal structure in some Gregorian offertories, and Aquitanian offertory-prosulas and their significance for the history of offertory-melismas.
Order Phymosomatoida Family Phymosomatidae Genus Micropsis COTTEAU, 1856 Micropsis aff tremadesi COTTEAU P1.7, fig.3 1890 Micropsis tremadesi COTTEAU, p.96, PIXV/3-6 Material - 2 Samples Distribution - Aquitanian of Eidajti and Shurab.
In 1995, after the initial joint acquisition with Notre Dame, Theodore Karp, a distinguished Midwestern musicologist at an institution not yet a Newberry partner, brought to the Newberry's attention a liturgical codex copied in about 1300 that contained a rare example of Aquitanian neumatic notation, a form of musical notation that antedated the square notation customarily found in late medieval manuscripts and early printed tomes.