arabesque

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arabesque

(ărəbĕsk`) [Fr.,=Arabian], in art, term applied to any complex, linear decoration based on flowing lines. In Islamic art it was often exploited to cover entire surfaces. The arabesque in modern usage derives from a Renaissance design which was Greco-Roman in inspiration.
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Arabesque

Generic term for an intricate and subtle ornate surface decoration based on a mixture of intermixed geometrical patterns and natural botanical forms used in Muslim countries.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

arabesque

arabesque
1. Intricate overall pattern of geometric forms or stylized plants used in Muslim countries.
2. Overall decorative pattern of acanthus scrolls, swags, candelabrum shafts, animal or human forms, on panels or pilasters, in Roman and Renaissance architecture.
3. A species of ornament of infinite variety used for enriching flat surfaces or moldings, either painted, inlaid, or carved in low relief.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

arabesque

1. Ballet a classical position in which the dancer has one leg raised behind and both arms stretched out in one of several conventional poses
2. Music a piece or movement with a highly ornamented or decorated melody
3. Arts
a. a type of curvilinear decoration in painting, metalwork, etc., with intricate intertwining leaf, flower, animal, or geometrical designs
b. a design of flowing lines
4. designating, of, or decorated in this style
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Following an overview of the main interpretations of the novel that reveals them as ideological readings focused on locating a specific subject, we will delineate two key forms in which Arabesques resists the construction of subjectivities: the parody that appears in its "Teller" segment and undermines the possibility of constructing an ideological subject, and the breach of the autobiographical contract that appears in the "Tale" segment, which deconstructs the possibility of establishing a subject through the personal life story.
Rachel Cowgill and Hilary Poriss [Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012], 186-205.) More should have been made of the essential differences between decorative melodies and true arabesques and the gendered context of ornamentation overall, and I wished for a broader selection of repertoire.
Muslim art's arabesque motif is used to represent these diverse perspectives on the landscape, State, and modernity (particularly as it relates to traditional vs.
"Andaluciat presents the most exclusive and comprehensive selection of handcrafted Moroccan and Arabesque designs, ranging from contemporary simplicity to traditional complexity," he says.
The Albums and Arabesques are character pieces in the romantic tradition, not as captivating or significant perhaps as Scenes from Childhood or Album for the Young, but useful and accessible nonetheless.
As Odette/Odile in Swan Lake, Kolesnikova performs without misusing high arabesques and attitudes.
The marginalia inscribed by Albrecht Durer in the Prayer Book he illustrated for the Emperor Maximilian, which are full of witty grotesquerie and tendril-like, hyperexpressive arabesques, constitute perhaps the last grand statements of the genre.
The single leg kick: This helps control the muscles around your hip joints, building your stability for centerwork like battements and arabesques. Lie down on your stomach.
Thus the double wall at Viafarini was also a floating mosaic, a puzzle of piercings where each, with its refined design, recalled the enervating finesse of Middle Eastern or medieval arabesques. This is the "marvelous fairy-tale garden" that the eminent art historian Julius von Schlosser once evoked--in Die Kunst des Mittelalters (1923)--with regard to the aesthetic presuppositions of the Middle Ages, where "all limitations of space and time are without meaning, so that the very world of phenomena turns into a fantastic fable."
All of the other works in this volume, Four Arabesques, Op.
After the initial fashion-plate poses of the ballerinas in cascading, color-layered tutus (Haydee Morales' gorgeous rendering of the Karinska originals), three duets showed panache in beats, then leaps, and finally arabesques, when eerily ardent Katia Carranza surrendered to Kenta Shimizu's willing hands.