Arab

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Related to Arabians: Arabian culture

Arab

(ā`răb), in the Bible, hill town of S ancient Palestine, near Hebron.

Arab

1. a member of a Semitic people originally inhabiting Arabia, who spread throughout the Middle East, N Africa, and Spain during the seventh and eighth centuries ad
2. a lively intelligent breed of horse, mainly used for riding
References in classic literature ?
My father was a missionary in the interior and one day there came a band of Arabian slave raiders.
Felix seemed peculiarly happy and with smiles of delight welcomed his Arabian.
The Arabian Edrisi portrays it under the name of the Gulf of Colzoum, and relates that vessels perished there in great numbers on the sandbanks and that no one would risk sailing in the night.
That trout was, so to speak, out of the Arabian Nights.
It's an Arabian Night; that's what it is,' said Richard.
And now," he exclaimed, remembering the tale of the Arabian fisherman, which Faria had related to him, "now, open sesame
Dick," he said earnestly, "if only you'd believe it, the adventures in the Arabian Nights were as nothing compared with the present-day drama of foreign politics.
She would have liked to choke old Sedley, but she swallowed her mortification as well as she had the abominable curry before it, and as soon as she could speak, said, with a comical, good-humoured air, "I ought to have remembered the pepper which the Princess of Persia puts in the cream-tarts in the Arabian Nights.
He had brought a new copy of The Arabian Nights for Rebecca, wishing to replace the well-worn old one that had been the delight of her girlhood; but meeting her at such an inauspicious time, he had absently carried it away with him.
As he approached, he heard the noise of the pulleys which grated under the weight of the massy pails; he also fancied he heard the melancholy moaning of the water which falls back again into the wells -- a sad, funereal, solemn sound, which strikes the ear of the child and the poet -- both dreamers -- which the English call splash; Arabian poets, gasgachau; and which we Frenchmen, who would be poets, can only translate by a paraphrase -- the noise of water falling into water.
Tangier is a foreign land if ever there was one, and the true spirit of it can never be found in any book save The Arabian Nights.
These birds were of enormous size, and reminded Zeb of the rocs he had read about in the Arabian Nights.