Arable Land


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Arable Land

 

agricultural land that is systematically tilled and used for crops. Arable land includes fields for crop rotation (including fallow land), gardens, and land being cleared for cultivation. Arable land made up 30 percent of the world’s agricultural land in 1960 and 32 percent in 1973. The corresponding figures for the USSR were 40.9 percent and 37 percent.

References in periodicals archive ?
The lower porosity and saturation percentage in arable land could be due to compaction and breakdown of soil aggregates [3, 38].
The New Urban Communities Authority (NUCA) has destroyed and removed arable lands in Beni Suef and Fayoum so that they can use the land for their New Fayoum City construction project, according to the Association of Legal Cooperative to Support Workers' Awareness.
For his part, the Undersecetary of the Ministry of Agriculture in Bahrain praised the efforts being exerted by the government of Sudan to improve the investment environment in the country, expressing his country's desire to invest in Sudan, especially in the food security projects, lauding the comparative advantages enjoyed by Sudan in terms of tremendous resources, arable land and abundant water a matter that contributed to the attraction investors.
In Austria, 15,000 hectares of arable land, 1,000 hectares of land used for fruit and vegetables, as well as vineyards and grassland were hit.
He said every year many plots of arable land become dormant and unusable through division of fields among relatives, adding that the situation has the potential to end agriculture completely in Turkey within 50 years.
23 acres of good quality arable land at Astley which sold for PS530,000 (PS9,430 per acre).
5 billion hectares) and arable land (30 percent, approximately 1.
The truth, he writes, can again be found in the numbers--26% of Earth's arable land used for grazing and a third of all arable land used for feed crop production.
During her UP presentation, Dambisa will discuss the implications of water, arable land, and fossil fuels running out across global markets; and particularly, what it means to the US.
official calls the practice of plundering the seas for fish and seafood "ocean-grabbing," similar in nature to "land-grabbing," defined as for the purchase or leasing of tracts of arable land in Africa by companies in Europe, the Middle East and China, some of whom are accused of exhausting the soil, depleting water resources and exploiting local labor in order to provide food for a lucrative market back home.
Savills' survey shows the average value of grade 3 arable land in England increased by 7.
Under the plans, farmers with more than 3ha of arable land would have to plant at least three crops, irrespective of whether those crops are suited to their land or systems.