Arable Land

(redirected from Arable agriculture)
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Arable Land

 

agricultural land that is systematically tilled and used for crops. Arable land includes fields for crop rotation (including fallow land), gardens, and land being cleared for cultivation. Arable land made up 30 percent of the world’s agricultural land in 1960 and 32 percent in 1973. The corresponding figures for the USSR were 40.9 percent and 37 percent.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
He said government had pu in place programmes such as Integrated Support Programme for Arable Agriculture Development (ISPAAD) and Livestock Management and Infrastructure Development (LIMID) to promote agricultural output, and tangible results over the years had been realised.
Climate, soil quality and landscape make the country relatively unsuited to arable agriculture, so the industry is dominated by cattle and sheep, which produce the potent greenhouse gas methane as part of their digestive process.
There is hardly any reference to producing forest products for domestic use and for exports; for creating livelihoods for poor people in the countryside, particularly the lumads whose vast ancestral domains are often slope lands not very suitable for arable agriculture but more ecologically suited for agroforestry and forest plantations.
Meeting houses and churches are informal channels through which rural women access information and/or services concerning arable agriculture. Such pieces of information and/or services are geared toward improving their farming techniques or acquiring new agricultural production techniques (seed treatment methods) and agricultural production materials like seeds.
It will look at how crop protection based on agrochemicals has revolutionised arable agriculture and horticulture.
Since arable agriculture is a global industry, such cooling could be extensive.
Even without the need to grow feed for animals, the intensive arable agriculture required to feed us all would decimate our wildlife.
Arable agriculture now conducts many of its activities at night, while animal husbandry is dictated by the needs of the animals - not time zones.
These it referred to as "arable agriculture", which is "the feeding and management of the flocks and herds".
He however said the country was moving in that direction citing the Integrated Support Programme for Arable Agriculture Development clusters.