Arachne


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Arachne

(ərăk`nē), in Greek mythology, a Lydian woman who challenged AthenaAthena
, or Pallas Athena
, in Greek religion and mythology, one of the most important Olympian deities. According to myth, after Zeus seduced Metis he learned that any son she bore would overthrow him, so he swallowed her alive.
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 to a trial of skill in weaving. When Arachne won, the goddess forced Arachne to hang herself. Athena then turned Arachne into a spider and her weaving into a cobweb.

Arachne

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Arachne, asteroid 407 (the 407th asteroid to be discovered, on October 13, 1895), is approximately 104 kilometers in diameter and has an orbital period of 4¼ years. Arachne was named after a Greek dyer and weaver who, after a competition with Athena, hanged herself and changed into a spider. This asteroid’s key words are “entangled” and “network.” According to Martha Lang-Wescott, Arachne indicates “reactions to people and situations that are very involved.” Jacob Schwartz gives this asteroid’s astrological significance as “pride in the ability to handle intricate detail, creation of intrigue.” It also represents webs (both actual and psychological), intrigue, entanglement, and perceptions of intricacy.

Sources:

Lang-Wescott, Martha. Asteroids-Mechanics: Ephemerides II. Conway, MA: Treehouse Mountain, 1990.
Lang-Wescott, Martha. Mechanics of the Future: Asteroids. Rev. ed. Conway, MA: Treehouse Mountain, 1991.
Schwartz, Jacob. Asteroid Name Encyclopedia. St. Paul, MN: Llewellyn Publications, 1995.

Arachne

presumptuously challenges Athena to weaving contest; transformed into spider. [Gk. Myth.: Leach, 69]

Arachne

skilled weaver; changed into spider for challenging Athena to weaving contest. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 27]

Arachne

won weaving contest against Athena, who then changed her into a spider. [Gk. Myth.: Jobes, 116]
References in periodicals archive ?
The latter is perhaps best expressed in Ovid's vivid rendering of the contest between Minerva (Athena) and Arachne, a mortal "whose skill in spinning [...] was earning no less admiration than that of Minerva herself" (134) and who was transformed into a spider by the goddess.
As my own contribution to this volume on Juana Ines de la Cruz's minor forms of writing, I would like to think through weaving figures with her and about her, as alternatives to the mythologeme of Penelope, or the exceptional Arachne or Athena.
Lenk is being literal: Playing Arachne, the show's magical spider-woman, she was suspended in a gigantic web throughout.
Further research led me to Oppenheim's collection of photographs in an online archive, the Arachne database at Cologne University.
as a graduate sociology student, and Arachne as a bus driver.
Thus this volume gives us Zeus and Europa, Perseus and Medusa, Theseus and Ariadne, Hades and Persephone, Athena and Arachne and, finally, Daedalus and Icarus.
Deucalion is just one of many artists Ovid shows transforming and animating materials in new ways: Pygmalion, Orpheus, Arachne, Marsyas ...
In an image inspired by Ovid's Metamorphoses, the mortal weaver Arachne challenged the goddess to a tapestry-weaving contest, which resulted in a tie.
The very few experimental writers in another vein than the realistic, such as those in the magazines Hilltop and Arachne, have obviously suffered from a lack of solid beams from which to spin their insubstantial webs....
The Babylonians, the Greeks and later the Romans all used sundials--the hemicyclium, the arachne, the antiboreum--but come a cloudy day, these were just clever paperweights.
In Cervantes's simile, translation is "like looking at Flemish tapestries from the wrong side, for although the figures are visible, they are covered by threads that obscure them, and cannot be seen with the smoothness and color of the right side." Kathryn Vomero Santos unpicks this old simile in '"The knots within': Translations, Tapestries, and the Art of Reading Backwards." Bringing knowledge of early modern textiles, Santos explains that "Renaissance tapestries were actually woven from behind, thus making the 'knottie wrong-side' the site of their creation rather than a symbol of secondary imperfection." The tapestry simile first reminds us of the old connection between textiles and texts, found in the Arachne myth and in the Latin etymon, texere, to weave.
Perhaps an even more archetypical representation of the act of speaking truth to power involves another Ovidian character who, like Philomela, communicated through images: Ovid's Arachne used the art of weaving to disclose the abuses of the gods in a contest against Minerva, the goddess of needlework, wisdom, and warfare.