arahant


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Related to arahant: Arhat, Dukkha, Anatman

arahant

or

arhat:

see BuddhismBuddhism
, religion and philosophy founded in India c.525 B.C. by Siddhartha Gautama, called the Buddha. There are over 300 million Buddhists worldwide. One of the great world religions, it is divided into two main schools: the Theravada or Hinayana in Sri Lanka and SE Asia, and
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References in periodicals archive ?
(31) Buddhadasa, 'Ruang kantamroi Phra Arahant' [Following the steps of the Arahant], Buddhasasana 1, 1 (1933): 4; Dhamma practice section.
An exposition of relics of Arahant bhikkus brought down from Myanmar by the Bosath Sir Lanka Foundation was also opened by President Sirisena at the venue.
The trusteeship power of the State under the Buddhist Kings was extended to protect animals, birds and other living creatures of the land, pursuant to this moving plea of Arahant Mahinda.
It goes back and forth between the "arahant summer course" in 1983 and a scene set in 2008 at the Suvannabhumi Airport.
The Buddha says, in the Anguttara Nikaya, that it may be possible for a person to claim to have been free from physical disease even for a hundred years, but it is not possible for a person to claim to have been free from mental disease even for one day, except for an Arahant, i.e., a perfected disciple or a Buddha.
Lest we forget, Thailand is still one of the few remaining Buddhist countries where the Arahant (self-accomplished "saint") ideal and its liberating possibilities remains alive, and well in the collective imagination.
as a natural victim or an arahant was clouded by a breeze
During the 3rd Century BC, Arahant Mahinda introduced the doctrine of Buddhism on a Poson Full Moon day.
Reflections on the Arahant in the Nikayas." Contemporary Buddhism 4 (2003), 33-54.
Khruba Bunchum's long period of meditation led some of his followers to see him as a phra arahan, or arahant, a term used to describe a monk who has reached enlightenment and thus escaped the cycle of death and rebirth.
Patrick Pranke starts off by locating the weikza cults into the larger Burmese Buddhist landscape and compares the Theravada trajectory of becoming an arahant with the esoteric ideal of weikza-hood.
In the Upasakamanussavinaya the standard set of five extremely grave offenses, namely killing one's parents or an arahant, spilling the blood of a Buddha, causing schism in the Sangha, or raping a nun, not only ensure hell but also make one parajika 'defeated', i.e., expelled from the Sangha and not allowed to rejoin, even if one is not ordained at the time of committing them.