Aramaeans

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Aramaeans

 

nomadic Semitic tribes whose native land was the Arabian Peninsula. First mention of the Aramaeans dates from the middle of the third millennium B.C. In the 14th century B.C., the Aramaeans penetrated into the Syrian Desert as well as the central Euphrates region; by the turn of the 11th century B.C., they had overrun almost all of Southwest Asia. In a number of places (for example, to the East of the Jordan River), the Aramaeans became a settled people. By 1 A.D., Aramaic, which belongs to the Semitic group, had become the major spoken language of Southwest Asia. The descendants of the Aramaeans are the present-day Assyrians (Aisors).

REFERENCES

D’iakonov, I. M. “Narody drevnei Perednei Azii.” In Peredneaziatskii etnograficheskii sb., book 1. Moscow, 1958.
Dupont-Sommer, A. Les Araméens. Paris, [1949].
References in periodicals archive ?
Trevor Bryce, in his recent study of the Neo-Hittite and Aramaean kingdoms to the west of the rising Assyrian power, shows clear evidence that it showed little leniency to those vassal states that were incorporated within its empire.
What would seem to work against this answer is Laban, who would have had to marry in for his daughters to be acceptable as wives for Jacob, yet he and his father are described as Aramaeans, not Hebrews.
When tribally (i.e., personalistically) organized groups -- Amorites around 2000 B.C., and Aramaeans after 1100 B.C.
Archaeologists, art historians, and theologians investigate the character of the borders of Aramaean polities during the Iron Age; how the position of those borders connected with cultural, economic, and other influences; and the impact of elements such as ethnicity, trade, language, desire to dominate others, and political pragmatism on determining borders.
Outside kings, among them assumedly both Aramaean tribal kings and sedentary Luwian states began making demands on the weakened state of Sama'al.
As we have argued above, the sociolinguistic situation in the Levant and Syria was not conducive to this type of borrowing: Aramaic dialects were unlikely to be the prestige language in the area given the relative political disadvantage of the Aramaean polities compared with the much more established Israelite and Phoenician kingdoms in the early first millennium.
This Ahab had done recently in Aramaean Wars I and II, and he would soon do so again in Aramaean War III, but it is not known whether he also took the field in person at Qarqara.
(14) When the Romans conquered Damascus in 64 CE the Aramaean storm-god Hadad became assimilated to Jupiter, and the site of the Temple of Hadad, dating back no earlier than the first century BCE, was appropriated for the Roman Temple of Jupiter, which was rebuilt and altered throughout the next two centuries.
Ten essays are: Geshur: the southwesternmost Aramean Kingdom; Arameans, Chaldeans, and Arabs in cuneiform sources from the Late Babylonian Period; nachbarn, verwandte, feinde und gefahrten: Die oAramaero im Alten Testament; the political history and historical geography of the Aramean, Chaldean, and Arab tribes in Babylonia in the Neo-Assyrian Period; the Arameans in the West (13th-8th centuries); Early Iron Age KinneretuEarly Aramaean or just Late Canaanite?
(35.) The Hermopolis letters provide an illustration of the practice: The eight papyri were letters sent by Aramaean soldiers stationed in Memphis to family in Syene (A2.1-4; D1.1) and Thebes (A2.5-7).
This volume truly contains a rich and very comprehensive treatment of just about every major topic that one could wish to find in such a volume and even provides overviews of Aramaeans in other parts of the ancient Near East, as well as of the Aramaean heritage.
Notably, at least one site was part of an Aramaean kingdom (Bethsaida, the capital of Geshur), and it is possible that a few others were under Aramaean control prior to their destruction at the hands of the Assyrians, and therefore outside the kingdom of Israel.