Aramaeans

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Aramaeans

 

nomadic Semitic tribes whose native land was the Arabian Peninsula. First mention of the Aramaeans dates from the middle of the third millennium B.C. In the 14th century B.C., the Aramaeans penetrated into the Syrian Desert as well as the central Euphrates region; by the turn of the 11th century B.C., they had overrun almost all of Southwest Asia. In a number of places (for example, to the East of the Jordan River), the Aramaeans became a settled people. By 1 A.D., Aramaic, which belongs to the Semitic group, had become the major spoken language of Southwest Asia. The descendants of the Aramaeans are the present-day Assyrians (Aisors).

REFERENCES

D’iakonov, I. M. “Narody drevnei Perednei Azii.” In Peredneaziatskii etnograficheskii sb., book 1. Moscow, 1958.
Dupont-Sommer, A. Les Araméens. Paris, [1949].
References in periodicals archive ?
Outside kings, among them assumedly both Aramaean tribal kings and sedentary Luwian states began making demands on the weakened state of Sama'al.
Lasting hegemonic rule in the region was only made possible by massive cultural shifts: first Assyria broke the resistance of the fractious Aramaeans to imperial rule, then it virtually annihilated the Elamites in a military campaign during Assyria's final decline.
Middle Assyrian texts until the final subjugation of the Aramaean states in the seventh century.
This Ahab had done recently in Aramaean Wars I and II, and he would soon do so again in Aramaean War III, but it is not known whether he also took the field in person at Qarqara.
The narrative turns on foreign conquests recorded in biblical and Assyrian texts, the latter those of the probable assailants, but without physical remains confirming or bolstering either Aramaeans or Assyrians as the perpetrators.
Part II presents the evidence for the history of the Neo-Hittite kingdoms (in detail) and the Aramaean and other Iron Age Near Eastern states (in overview) and is intended as a reference guide for part III.
The volumes of Donner and Rollig on Canaanite and Aramaic inscriptions include lists of Canaanite and Aramaean names (1964: 45-52, 53-56), and Sivan's book includes an investigation of West Semitic names in Bronze Age sources from Canaan and Syria (1984).
On the So-Called Aramaean "Siege Trench" in Tell es-Safi.
These include Wicke's analysis of the "roundcheeked and ringletted" ivories, Gubel's work on Phoenician and Aramaean bridle-harness decoration, and Rehm's study of the style of furniture shown in Neo-Assyrian palace reliefs.
The foundation of the Aramaean settlement at Syene is more difficult to date, but based on information especially from the Papyrus Amherst 63 (the unique Aramaic text in Demotic script) Porten finds their origins to have been Arash/Rash (a land between Babylonia and Elam), as well as southern Syria (Bit Agusi and Hamath), with a migration to Samaria in the days of Assurbanipal before they came to Egypt.
19:35), creates the illusion of a huge army of chariots against the Aramaeans (II Kgs.
Starting from the third millennium BC, Arab tribes of the Arabian Peninsula: Acadians, the Amorites, Aramaeans, the Nabataeans, Elsafa n and Ghassanids came and settled in Gharia and other areas.