Aramaeans


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Related to Aramaeans: Cambyses, Nabonidus

Aramaeans

 

nomadic Semitic tribes whose native land was the Arabian Peninsula. First mention of the Aramaeans dates from the middle of the third millennium B.C. In the 14th century B.C., the Aramaeans penetrated into the Syrian Desert as well as the central Euphrates region; by the turn of the 11th century B.C., they had overrun almost all of Southwest Asia. In a number of places (for example, to the East of the Jordan River), the Aramaeans became a settled people. By 1 A.D., Aramaic, which belongs to the Semitic group, had become the major spoken language of Southwest Asia. The descendants of the Aramaeans are the present-day Assyrians (Aisors).

REFERENCES

D’iakonov, I. M. “Narody drevnei Perednei Azii.” In Peredneaziatskii etnograficheskii sb., book 1. Moscow, 1958.
Dupont-Sommer, A. Les Araméens. Paris, [1949].
References in periodicals archive ?
As the Aramaeans began to migrate in force and even settle in the territories of well-established states such as Sama'al, they continued to be a force of disruption, especially as they demanded more and more control of the regions in which they lived.
The successive waves of migration were by Akkadians (5,000 years ago), Amorites (4,000 years ago), Aramaeans (about 3,000 years ago), and Arabs (in the seventh century).
Lasting hegemonic rule in the region was only made possible by massive cultural shifts: first Assyria broke the resistance of the fractious Aramaeans to imperial rule, then it virtually annihilated the Elamites in a military campaign during Assyria's final decline.
The substantial number of Persians and persianized Aramaeans who convened to Islam had, however, varied economic backgrounds.
The Aramaean center closest to the Hebrew-speaking area is Damascus, which is first mentioned in Assyrian sources in the mid ninth century.
But King Joram returned to Jezreel to be healed of his wounds that the Aramaeans had given him when he fought with Hazael, the King of Aram (9:14; cf.
Thus, while this is hardly a happy time for anyone who cares about Syria--past, present, and future--the volume under review is of importance, since it is an excellent and up-to-date overview and summary of the most recent study of the Aramaeans of Iron Age Syria, including studies by some of the leading researchers in this field, among them some of the excavators themselves.
The narrative turns on foreign conquests recorded in biblical and Assyrian texts, the latter those of the probable assailants, but without physical remains confirming or bolstering either Aramaeans or Assyrians as the perpetrators.
Morrow, "The Sefire Treaty Stipulations and the Meso-potamian Treaty Tradition," in The World of the Aramaeans III: Studies in Language and Literature in Honour of Paul-Eugene Dion, ed.
(37.) I wonder if he did not intend the sun god Malakbel, venerated in the caravan city of Palmyra, whose pantheon incorporated Babylonian and Syro-Palestinian elements, and whose population consisted of Amoriles, Aramaeans, and Arabs.
A specially interesting case is Aram' < *' aram (like Arabic' af'al), which the author sees as internal plural of ri'm 'wild bull,' "the totem of Aramaeans."
in The Aramaeans: Their Ancient History, Culture, Religion (Leuven: Peeters.