Arbeiderbladet

Arbeiderbladet

 

(Workers’ Newspaper), a Norwegian daily newspaper, central organ of the Norwegian Labor Party. Founded in Oslo in 1884 under the name Vort Arbeide (Our Labor); from 1886 to 1923 it was called Social-Demokraten (The Social Democrat). Circulation, about 70,000(1968).

References in periodicals archive ?
But he also wanted to get as thorough an impression of the Norwegian people as is possible on a 'French visit.' (11) The following day Arbeiderbladet (now Dagsavisen) published a similar story, mentioning the Chaplin remarks and the assessment of contemporary English literature.
Few of the younger ones have so far shown themselves as possessing significant talents for fiction.' The Arbeiderbladet story also added a bit about Waugh's war experience liaising with Tito's forces in Yugoslavia: "In fact, I would rather have become a parachutist, but I was too fat."
"40-aringene dominerer engelsk literature." Arbeiderbladet (Oslo).
Brandt had come to Norway shortly after the troops under the National Socialists took command, and he continued his journalistic work right after his arrival, writing for the Arbeiderbladet (Grebing, 2008).
Through an interview in the main Labour newspaper Arbeiderbladet (The Labour Paper), Trotsky was given an opportunity to confront the accusations made against him in Moscow.
In 1923 it was re-named Arbeiderbladet. It soon became the leading newspaper in the rapidly growing Labour press, which additionally consisted of papers like Bergens Arbeiderblad and Nordlys in Tromso, among others.
In Oslo this conflict played itself out as a conflict between Arbeiderbladet, on the one hand, and non-socialist papers like Aftenposten, Dagbladet and Tidens Tegn, on the other.
The number of party newspapers dwindled, and papers with political titles changed their names: Bergens Arbeiderbladbecame Bergensavisen (BA), Arbeiderbladet continued as Dagsavisen, etc.
Treholt entered the Norwegian foreign ministry after a spell as a journalist at the Arbeiderbladet daily national newspaper.
(15) In the years after 1945, big newspapers like Aftenposten and Arbeiderbladet started to establish their own network of foreign correspondents covering world events.
The main Labour newspaper, Arbeiderbladet, changed its view from support to critique.