Arboviruses


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Related to Arboviruses: arboviral encephalitis

Arboviruses

 

(contraction of arthropod-borne viruses), viruses of vertebrate animals and man transmitted by arthropods (ticks, mosquitoes, gnats, and sand flies) in whose bodies they reproduce but do not have pathogenic action. Arboviruses are the causative agents of various en-cephalitides, hemorrhagic fever, and other diseases whose natural foci coincide with the habitats of the transmitters of arboviruses. More than 200 arboviruses are known; they are subdivided into several groups (A, B, C) according to their antigenic properties. Over 50 are pathogenic for man. Arboviruses range in size from 30 to 180 nanometers and have a spherical or rodlike shape. They contain ribonucleic acid, protein, and a lipid-rich membrane.

References in periodicals archive ?
The air and maritime ports of Iran serve international customers and are therefore at risk for the introduction of mosquito vectors and arboviruses, as well as other infectious diseases.
After identification, mosquitoes were pooled by species and tested for arboviruses. Pools ranged from 1-25 mosquitoes depending on submission numbers.
While more than 100 arboviruses can cause infection, some of the more common arboviruses associated with human disease include West Nile, first detected in the United States in 1999, and chikungunya, first reported in the Americas in 2013, with local transmission documented in Florida, Puerto Rico, and the U.S.
Traditionally, arboviruses were subdivided into groups A through D, made up of various genera.
Natural isolations of other arboviruses of public health importance
Using the 2005 CSTE assessment procedure that measured capacity in 2004; new CDC guidelines for WNV surveillance, prevention, and control (5); and technical assistance from CDC, a CSTE workgroup developed an assessment tool to describe human, mosquito, and laboratory surveillance capacity for WNV and other arboviruses in 2012 and to compare responses with those from 2004.
Only certain types of mosquitoes, however, carry arboviruses, and transmission does not occur all the time.
Seroepidemiology of dengue and other arboviruses in a natural population of toque macaques (Macaca sinica) at Polonnaruwa, Sri Lanka.
Researchers in many different countries and climates explore such topics as RNAi and the study of insect immunity, the Picorna-like Kakugo virus identified in aggressive honeybee workers, encephalitic arboviruses as an emerging and re-emerging problem, neurologic manifestations of West Nile Virus infection, the effects of co-infection with Borrelia Burgdorferi and Anaplasma Phagocytophilum in vector ticks and vertebrate hosts, and the cellular secretion of Sf21 cells upon baculovirus infection.
Environmental conditions, especially landscape ecology, temperature, and precipitation, have an important effect on the distribution of the mosquitoes that harbor the arboviruses, thereby influencing seasonal virus activity (Andreadis et al., 2001; Hayes, 1981; Hunter, 2003; Turell, Sandelis, Dohm, & O'Guinn, 2001).