Arboviruses


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Related to Arboviruses: arboviral encephalitis

Arboviruses

 

(contraction of arthropod-borne viruses), viruses of vertebrate animals and man transmitted by arthropods (ticks, mosquitoes, gnats, and sand flies) in whose bodies they reproduce but do not have pathogenic action. Arboviruses are the causative agents of various en-cephalitides, hemorrhagic fever, and other diseases whose natural foci coincide with the habitats of the transmitters of arboviruses. More than 200 arboviruses are known; they are subdivided into several groups (A, B, C) according to their antigenic properties. Over 50 are pathogenic for man. Arboviruses range in size from 30 to 180 nanometers and have a spherical or rodlike shape. They contain ribonucleic acid, protein, and a lipid-rich membrane.

References in periodicals archive ?
Matheus is a research assistant at the Institute Pasteur de la Guyane, French Guiana, with research interests in the diagnosis and pathophysiology of arboviruses.
After identification, mosquitoes were pooled by species and tested for arboviruses.
While more than 100 arboviruses can cause infection, some of the more common arboviruses associated with human disease include West Nile, first detected in the United States in 1999, and chikungunya, first reported in the Americas in 2013, with local transmission documented in Florida, Puerto Rico, and the U.
The immunologic systems of Europeans and North Americans have no antibodies to tropical arboviruses, leaving them virtually defenseless against them.
Arboviruses continue to cause substantial morbidity in the United States, although reported numbers of cases vary annually.
The mosquitoes showed a wide-spectrum susceptibility to arboviruses which included members of the family Togaviridae, Flaviviridae, Rhabdoviridae and Bunyaviridae.
Only certain types of mosquitoes, however, carry arboviruses, and transmission does not occur all the time.
First isolation of arboviruses from phlebotomine sandflies in West Africa.