minute of arc

(redirected from Arc-second)
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minute of arc

(arc minute; arc min) See arc second.
References in periodicals archive ?
The subject of this tender is the supply, delivery, installation and commissioning of one (1) 5 arc-second motorized total station and related equipment.
These capabilities allow highly-skilled technicians to hit high precision specifications such as [lambda]/20 irregularity, 0.5 arc-second angular tolerances and 10-5 surface quality.
NGC 6210 is at a distance of 1.57[+ or -]0.40 kiloparsecs [1] and has an angular diameter of 16 arc-seconds [2].
He estimates that the 10-meter mirror will ultimately resolve details just 0.25 arc-second across, fractionally better than the 0.3-arc-second resolution attained with the European Southern Observatory's far smaller 3.5-meter telescope in Chile.
Around periastron in June 2005 they were only 0.4 arc-second apart, making Porrima appear single in almost any telescope.
He argues that by using higher-quality mirrors and compensating for the oscillations that regularly shake a telescope, astronomers could build large telescopes -- for example, those with a 5-meter aperture -- that routinely achieve a resolution of 0.05 arc-second at an infrared wavelength of 2 microns.
This curtain of gaseous sulfur, representing the no-man's-land between the nebula and its neighbor, concentrates in clumps and filaments, some measuring only 0.1 arc-second in diameter -- a scale beyond the resolving power of ground-based telescopes, says astronomer J.
Such a planet would typically lurk just 0.1 arc-second from its host star, which would outshine it by 10 billion times.
The rates can be adjusted from less than 1 arc-second per second for guiding to a few degrees per second for slewing.
The angular resolution or sharpness of the pictures is 1.1 arc-seconds. The space-based image has a resolution of about 0.2 arc-second.
This means the location of any known asteroid (or a new one whose orbital elements you enter) can be computed to arc-second accuracy for any date and time between the years 1950 and 2020.
The telescope's resolving power in visible light, about 0.1 arc-second (comparable to what's needed to distinguish a car's right headlight from its left at a distance of 2,500 miles), is indeed about 10 times the average resolving power of today's ground-based telescopes.