abbey

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abbey,

monastic house, especially among Benedictines and Cistercians, consisting of not less than 12 monks or nuns ruled by an abbot or abbess. Many abbeys were originally self-supporting. In the Benedictine expansion after the 8th cent., abbeys were often important centers of learning and peaceful arts and, like FuldaFulda
, city (1994 pop. 58,710), Hesse, central Germany, on the Fulda River. It is a banking and financial center. Manufactures include textiles and clothing. Fulda grew around a Benedictine abbey founded in 744 by Sturmius, a pupil of St. Boniface, the missionary.
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, were sometimes the nuclei of future towns. The buildings surround a church and include a dormitory, refectory, and guest house, all surrounded by a wall. The courtyard, derived from the Roman atriumatrium
, term for an interior court in Roman domestic architecture and also for a type of entrance court in early Christian churches. The Roman atrium was an unroofed or partially roofed area with rooms opening from it. In early times its center held a cooking hearth.
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, was a usual feature, as was the cloistercloister,
unroofed space forming part of a religious establishment and surrounded by the various buildings or by enclosing walls. Generally, it is provided on all sides with a vaulted passageway consisting of continuous colonnades or arcades opening onto a court.
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 or arcade surrounding the court. Cluniac abbeys were always ornate, Cistercian ones notably bare. The CarthusiansCarthusians
, small order of monks of the Roman Catholic Church [Lat. abbr.,=O. Cart.]. It was established by St. Bruno at La Grande Chartreuse (see Chartreuse, Grande) in France in 1084.
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 with their special polity developed an altogether different structure called the charterhouse.

Abbey

The monastic buildings of religious bodies governed by an abbot or abbess.

Abbey

 

a Catholic monastery governed by a father superior or, in a convent, by a mother superior, subordinate to a bishop and sometimes directly to the pope. The larger and wealthier monasteries owned much land and often played an important religious, political, and economic role in feudal Western Europe. Such monasteries included the abbeys of Cluny, Saint-Denis, Port Royal, Saint Gall, Fulda, and Monte Cassino. During the Reformation and especially during the bourgeois revolution, the abbey lost its significance in the life of European society. Many abbeys were liquidated, but some still exist today.

What does it mean when you dream about an abbey?

Dreaming of a convent or monastery may indicate that the dreamer needs to spend some time alone reflecting, or even needs to seek spiritual nourishment. Alternatively, it may symbolize isolation from the normal flow of life.

abbey

abbey: Plan of abbey of St. Germain-des-Prés, Paris, 13th cent. A, church; B, cloister; C, city gate; E, chapter house; F, chapel; G, refectory; H, cellars and presses; I, abbot’s lodging; K, ditches; L, gardens
A monastery or convent; particularly the church thereof.

abbey

1. a building inhabited by a community of monks or nuns governed by an abbot or abbess
2. a church built in conjunction with such a building
3. such a community of monks or nuns
References in periodicals archive ?
I spent a short week at the Archabbey, going about the daily monastic routine, before assembling with others in the basilica for my final oblation ceremony.
The Fred Rogers Center for Early Learning and Children's Media at Saint Vincent College and Archabbey, Latrobe, Pennsylvania included architectural wire mesh from Banker Wire in its award-winning design.
In the preface to this lengthy and admiring new history of Saint Vincent Archabbey, Jerome Oetgen explains that he set out "to provide a detailed history of Saint Vincent and its apostolates within the context of both monastic history and the history of the American Catholic Church" (viii).
Vincent Archabbey in Latrobe, Pennsylvania, the site of the first Benedictine settlement in the United States and still one of the largest Benedictine communities of men in the world, monks sponsor a 1,200-student, liberal-arts college that U.
Eugene Hensell, OSB, has been engaged in parish work, campus ministry and college teaching and fulltime retreat work, a Benedictine monk from the Archabbey of St.
Meinrad Archabbey and is author of The History of Black Catholics in the United States.
Eugene Hensell, OSB, has been engaged in parish work, campus ministry and college teaching and full-time retreat work, a Benedictine monk from the Archabbey of St.
Vincent Archabbey in Latrobe, where representatives of several Benedictine women's monasteries gathered in late June.
Meinrad Archabbey pursuant to the laws of the Roman Catholic church.
In hilltop monasteries and archabbeys, nuns and priests are still being trained.