Archimedean principle

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Archimedean principle

[¦är·kə¦mēd·ē·ən ′prin·sə·pəl]
(physics)
The principle that a body immersed in a fluid undergoes an apparent loss in weight equal to the weight of the fluid it displaces.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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Hensel (13) has introduced a normed space which does not have the Archimedean property. During the last three decades theory of non-Archimedean spaces has gained the interest of physicists for their research in particular in problems coming from quantum physics, p-adic strings and superstrings (17).
This, and the Archimedean property of H, give the desired fact.
He indeed introduced a field with a valuation norm, which does not have the Archimedean property. During the last three decades the theory of non-Archimedean spaces has gained the interest of physicists for their research, in particular the problems that emerge in quantum physics, p-adic strings and superstrings (see (15)).