Archimedes' screw

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Related to Archimedean screw: Archimedean solids

Archimedes' screw,

a simple mechanical device believed to have been invented by Archimedes in the 3d cent. B.C. It consists of a cylinder inside of which a continuous screw, extending the length of the cylinder, forms a spiral chamber. By placing the lower end in water and revolving the screw, water is raised to the top. The principle is applied in machines used for drainage and irrigation, and also in some types of high-speed tools. It can also be applied for handling light, loose materials such as grain, sand, and ashes.

Archimedes' screw

[¦är·kə¦mēd‚ēz ′skrü]
(mechanical engineering)
A device for raising water by means of a rotating broad-threaded screw or spirally bent tube within an inclined hollow cylinder.
References in periodicals archive ?
The 100kw electricity generator (hydro-turbine) powered by the Archimedean Screw will provide more than 75% of the power required for Freeman's Reach.
Contract Awarded for Design - Build of Mechanical and electrical works for the replacement of Archimedean screw pumps and associated works at the Cape Flats, Zandvliet and Mitchells Plain Wastewater Treatment Works
Harnessing energy from the River Wear, an Archimedean screw drives a generator which feeds the National Grid with power that is the equivalent of 75% of the energy requirements of Freeman's Reach.
It will use two Archimedean screw turbines, which were originally invented by the ancient Greeks to pump water upwards for irrigation.
In a conventional Archimedean screw, during the melting stage, breakage of the solid bed in the cross channel direction can occur.
Using the power of the river, the generator is able to produce electricity that is the equivalent of 75% of the total energy requirement of the development - and it's all made possible by a 13m-long, 20-tonne Archimedean screw, which is driven by the flow of the River Wear.
The 150KW plant at Osbaston is based on a screw-turbine called an Archimedean screw that was originally developed by the ancient Greeks to pump water upwards for irrigation.
The extrusion was carried out using an Emerson and Renwick Ltd Labline extruder employing an Archimedean screw mechanism consisting of a 25.
The power generation is made possible by a 13-metre long, 20-tonne Archimedean screw, which is driven by the flow of the River Wear.
During his visit, Rose was also shown the recently-installed Archimedean screw, which will power a hydro-turbine providing around 75% of the total power requirement at Freeman's Reach.
Mr Rose was also shown the recently-installed Archimedean screw, which will power a hydro-turbine and enable Freeman's Reach to become the first hydro-powered city centre development in the UK providing over 75% of its total power requirement.