Archimedean solid

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Archimedean solid

[¦är·kə¦mēd·ē·ən ′säl·əd]
(mathematics)
One of 13 possible solids whose faces are all regular polygons, though not necessarily all of the same type, and whose polyhedral angles are all equal.
Also known as semiregular solid.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
If you relax the conditions for generating the Platonic solids and specify that faces must be regular but not necessarily identical polygons, there are 13 such polyhedra, known as Archimedean solids. One example is the truncated icosahedron, familiar as the pattern on a soccer ball, which consists of 12 pentagons and 20 hexagons.
A paper-and-pencil geometry test (GT) about Platonic and Archimedean solids was constructed and used as the pre- and posttest instrument.
The left panel contains an index of the Platonic and Archimedean solids in alphabetical order.
The first version, Platonic and Archimedean Solids E-book (PASE), resembles a traditional print-based book with interactive, hypertextual features, as in typical e-books.
Archimedean solids also have identical vertices; however they are composed of two or more types of regular polygons.
Two different versions of a mathematics e-book were designed containing information about Platonic and Archimedean solids: a hypertextual version and a version augmented with interactive visuals.