Indian architecture

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Indian architecture

Indian architecture
The architecture of the Indian subcontinent, originally a timber and mud-brick architecture of which nothing survives. Early Buddhist monuments, chaitya halls, stupa rails, and toranas clearly imitate wood construction, and timber buildings appear on relief representations. All surviving architecture is of stone, using exclusively a structural system of post and lintel, brackets, and corbels. The basically simple Indian architectural forms are generally obscured and overwhelmed by a rhythmical multiplication of pilasters, cornices, moldings, aediculae, roofs, and finials, and an exuberant and sensuous overgrowth of sculptural decoration.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
With a career spanning six decades as an educator and an architect, writing a history of the modern architecture of India without acknowledging Doshi's seminal contributions, especially for reimagining low-cost housing, is impossible.
High Commissioner said that the immediate challenge confronting Indians at the time of independence was to frame a document which would govern the socio-politico-legal architecture of India in the years ahead.
Being the chief promoter of the European Indo Islamic" style he strongly advocated on the revivalism of indigenous architecture of India. As given in the preface of Jeypore Portfolio of Architectural Details London 1890-1913" according to Samuel Swinton Jacob the architectural works being carried out by the Public and Works Department were mundane standardized and unsympathetic to Oriental architecture and were steeped in stereotyped conventionality." (Jacobs 1890).
(1.) The classic work in this area, for example, Benjamin Rowland's The Art and Architecture of India, Baltimore: Penguin Books, 1967, does not contain any analysis of this work.
He was teaching pre-Islamic Art and Architecture of India and Pakistan and Ancient Civilization.
A torana (as defined in the glossary of Dhar's book on the topic) is an "arched portal or festoon." This seemingly simple definition hardly suggests the variety and importance of the torana in the architecture of India and Southeast Asia.
The topic of the lecture was "A New Architecture of India's Security".
Zaragoza contextualised the architecture of India and Europe within a social subtext.
New ceramic trivets have intricate raised details reminiscent of those found in the Mughal architecture of India's Taj Mahal.
The Temple Architecture of India is a splendid introduction to the field.

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