minute of arc

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minute of arc

(arc minute; arc min) See arc second.
References in periodicals archive ?
Each 1-arcsecond resolution product was converted to 3 arcseconds using a method appropriate to the type of data.
Its apparent diameter is also on the rise reaching 14.5 arcseconds by the end of the period, at which time it will be rising some 45 minutes before midnight.
The typical spatial resolution of those observations is 15 arcseconds or larger (1 arcsecond corresponds to 1/3600 of 1 degree), however, ALMA achieved a high resolution of 3.5 arcseconds in this test observation.
The dispersed planetary image at the focus of a telescope objective has its various wavelengths spread vertically over a small angular range, typically a few arcseconds at most, forming a short spectrum.
A telescope shows it to be a fine, close double star (separation 4.6 arcseconds) with both components yellow-orange.
The tiny distance between the star and the companion (0.156 arcseconds) is the same as the width of a dime seen eight miles away.
Its 216mm, 360-tooth gears on both axes provide a low periodic error of 3.5 arcseconds. Its spring-loaded saddle plate accepts Losmandy "D" style dovetail bars.
(3) Drake concluded that Galileo was generally able to resolve two satellites when they were separated by more than about 10 arcseconds. Unfortunately, it is difficult to verify Drake's calculations because he doesn't record either the ephemeris used or the exact times assumed for the observations.
Aim your scope at Venus and you'll discover that its disk is almost full, though only 10 arcseconds wide.
If the bullet model is correct and the shaft isn't simply an artifact of the image, then future Hubble photographs taken a year apart should show the material moving 2 to 3 arcseconds, about 0.03 light-years, across the sky
The pairings in his list range from 88.9 arcseconds apart (39 Draconis) to 15.4 arcminutes (Kappa Draconis).
Around this time Mercury will show a half-phase telescopically, similar to the first quarter Moon, but with an overall diameter of only 8 arcseconds; at least a 100mm aperture at x50 will be needed to show this well.