Arctic Zone


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Arctic Zone

[¦ärd·ik ¦zōn]
(geography)
The area north of the Arctic Circle (66°32′N).
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
By changing some of the indices on different areas of the Arctic region such as health measurements, social security, culture, welfare and others, it becomes possible to improve the level of social development of specific areas, which may increase the efficiency of oil and gas development of the Arctic zone of Russia.
The increased attention to the Arctic zone was historically determined mainly by the political and economic interests of using its rich resource potential, ensuring national security, and enhancing international political influence.
Instead, the military-security issue upon which the Russian Arctic policy primarily focuses is the defense and protection of the borders and area of the Russian Arctic zone. The primary border activities are
The US Geological Survey estimates that up to 25 percent of global oil and gas reserves may lie in the Arctic zone. Russia and Norway are currently developing their oil and gas fields in the Barents Sea.
Called the Arctic Zone, the cooler unit is available in many of Lane's motion configurations, including the new ActionMates correlates.
The Arctic Zone of the Russian Federation (AZRF), as Moscow calls it, is an expansive, transcontinental landscape that covers over half of the Arctic's nine million square miles.
On the same day a Round Table devoted to the "Development of Legal Regulation of Economic Activities in the Arctic Zone" took place.
The World Bank in a report said reduced investments in new exploration or development will especially put at risk oil investment projects in low-income countries or in unconventional sources and oil in the Arctic zone.
The Law of the Sea Convention was intended to resolve any and all marine conflicts, but some of its provisions leave space for interpretation, a fact duly noted and used by countries interested in expanding their possessions into the Arctic zone (see Lukaszuk, 2004).
"Reports from fishermen, seal hunters and explorers, he declared, all point to a radical change in climate conditions and hitherto unheard-of temperatures in the Arctic zone.