polar cyclone

(redirected from Arctic cyclone)

polar cyclone

[′pō·lər ′sī‚klōn]
(meteorology)
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Heavy snowis set to strike Britain again as a so-called 'Arctic cyclone' brings a new deep freeze with temperatures that could plunge well below zero, some forecasts claim.
It's been dubbed a rare 'Arctic cyclone' with cold air moving in from Scandinavia and Greenland, theExpressreported.
Polar vortex is considered an arctic cyclone of extremely cold air that spins counterclockwise around the north and south poles.
Ikeda, "Climatology and interannual variability of arctic cyclone activity: 1948 2002," Journal of Climate, vol.
Takahashi, "The structure and behavior of the arctic cyclone in summer analyzed by the JRA-25/JCDAS data," Polar Science, 2012.
ARCTIC CYCLONE: A powerful storm wreaked havoc on the Arctic sea ice cover in August 2012.
(2004), who noted not only an increase in Arctic cyclone activity in high latitudes and a decrease in mid latitudes from 1948 to 2002, but also a shift in storm tracks to the Arctic during summer, with stronger storms during winter.
"Without new data from the Arctic, we can't predict TPVs beyond a two-week period."<br />Cavallo is collaborating on this study with David Parsons, meteorology professor and school director, who is investigating the impact of ocean waves on TPVs and Arctic cyclones and whether warm, moist air injected into the Arctic influences the structure and intensity of TPVs and cyclones, and Xuguang Wang, meteorology professor, who is developing an optimal numerical weather prediction system to understand the Arctic features limiting predictability.<br />"TPVs are meso-scale (smaller) vortices about 5 miles up in the troposphere that are long-lived in the Arctic," said Cavallo.
The authors (Zabolotskikh et al., 2014) presented an approach based on satellite passive and active microwave methods to study motion of arctic cyclones. However, in this work very small images with insufficient data information and too-large images that contain insufficient features parameters decreased the feature identification probability.
More broadly, physical changes in the Arctic include warming ocean, soil, and air temperatures; melting permafrost; shifting vegetation and animal abundances; and altered characteristics of Arctic cyclones. All these changes are expected to affect traditional livelihoods and cultures in the region and survival of polar bear and other animal populations, and raise risks of pollution, food supply, safety, cultural losses, and national security.

Full browser ?