Arctiidae


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Arctiidae

[ärk′tī·ə‚dē]
(invertebrate zoology)
The tiger moths, a family of lepidopteran insects in the suborder Heteroneura.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Arctiidae

 

a family of moths, commonly called tiger moths. Wingspan, 3-8 cm. The wings are brilliantly colored and at rest are folded rooflike over the body.

The caterpillars are covered with hairs (often long ones) growing from flat warts. They are omnivorous, feeding chiefly on the leaves of herbaceous plants or lichens. Tiger moths hibernate as caterpillars and, rarely, as pupae.

There are about 5,000 species, found throughout the world, but with greatest variety in the tropics. About 200 species are found in the USSR. Certain tiger moths are pests; the fall web-worm (Hyphantria cuned) damages gardens and forests and representatives of the genus Ocnogyna harm pasture lands.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Composicao de especies de Arctiidae (Lepidoptera) no sul do Brasil: relacao entre tipos de vegetacao e entre a configuracao espacial do habitat.
and Shivakumar, M.S., Baseline susceptibility of five classes of insecticides on Bihar hairy caterpillar Spilosoma obliqua (Walk.) (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae).
Defense mechanisms of arthropods: stereochemical pathway of hy-droxydanaidal production from alkaloid precursors in Creatonotostransiens (Lepidoptera, Arctiidae).
Synergistic effect of entomogenous fungi on some insecticides against Bihar hairy caterpillar, Spilarctia obliqua (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae).
Thyretini of Africa; an illustrated catalogue of the thyretini (lepidoptera: arctiidae: syntominae) of the afrotropical region.
This genus was originally proposed in the Lithosiidae (now Arctiidae), but has since been transferred to the Geometridae; its first published use in this family appears to have been by Prout (1934).