lugworm

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lugworm:

see AnnelidaAnnelida
[Lat., anellus=a ring], phylum of soft-bodied, bilaterally symmetrical (see symmetry, biological), segmented animals, known as the segmented, or annelid, worms.
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lugworm

any polychaete worm of the genus Arenicola, living in burrows on sandy shores and having tufted gills: much used as bait by fishermen
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Respiratory movements of Arenicola marina L.: intermittent irrigation of the tube: and intermittent aerial respiration.
Defaecation in relation to the spontaneous activity cycles of Arenicola marina L.
Ventilatory and metabolic responses to hypoxia and sulphide in the lugworm, Arenicola marina (L.).
Fine structure of probable mechano- and chemoreceptors in the caudal epidermis of the lugworm Arenicola marina (Annelida, Polychaeta), Zoomorphology 105: 76-82.
Distribution and efficiency of bacteriolysis in the gut of Arenicola marina and three additional deposit feeders.
This study investigates egg and sperm longevity of the polychaetes Arenicola marina and Nereis virens and the asteroid Asterias rubens, which are all species that have seasonal reproduction.
In most populations of the lugworm Arenicola marina, spawning is epidemic, cued by environmental and endogenous factors (Bentley and Pacey, 1992; Watson and Bentley, 1998; Watson et al., 2000), and takes place over only a few days in late autumn in most localities (Williams et al., 1997).
Mature specimens of Arenicola marina were collected by digging from an intertidal sandflat at Red Wharf Bay, Anglesey, North Wales (53[degrees]18.6'N 4[degrees]12.0'W).
Arenicola marina. Mature oocytes were collected from animals induced to spawn by injection of homogenized prostomia from mature females, as described by Pacey and Bentley (1992).
For Arenicola marina and Asterias rubens, eggs from five females were used; for Nereis virens, eggs from three females were used.