Areopagitica


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Areopagitica

pamphlet supporting freedom of the press. [Br. Lit.: Benét, 46]
See: Freedom
References in classic literature ?
He held the licensing law in contempt, and to show his contempt he published Areopagitica without a license and without giving the printer's or bookseller's name.
friends of Truth" in Milton's Areopagitica, searching for the
Among their topics are the fragrance of the fall, Milton on the move: walking and self-knowledge in Paradise Lost, dark looks and red smiles: Homeric gesture and the problem of Milton's angels, and the scanning of error: Areopagitica and three-dimensional printed guns.
Keyword: Milton, Puritanism, Christianity, Literature, Areopagitica, Paradise Lost.
In his impassioned 1644 defense of freedom of expression, Areopagitica, John Milton stated that it was "as good almost [to] kill a Man as kill a good book" (page 7).
43) John Milton wrote Areopagitica to defend FoE against the forms of censorship and licensing practiced by the institutions of power.
If they are, as Milton said in Areopagitica, "embalmed and treasured up on purpose to a life beyond life" what is that purpose in a work like Red Letter Plays?
In this manner, Raphael embodies the central principle of Areopagitica (namely, that humanity must, with some qualification, be able to participate in free inquiry in the public sphere) by, paradoxically, embodying that essay's two greatest extremes, specifically the restrictive licensing and unbounded license between which Milton seeks to negotiate.
A champion of free speech, and a disciple of John Milton's Areopagitica, he was reluctant to discipline, let alone expel, leftist rebels from Militant Tendency when they campaigned against the parliamentary party.
In anticipation of what he would soon write in Areopagitica (1644), when he likened the search for Truth to Isis gathering up the "mangl'd limbs" of Osiris (11:549), Milton represents the current debates as a national endeavor to piece together lost Truth.
The divorce treatises reveal a mind rethinking "the transparency of Biblical authority" and modeling interpretive freedom for his readers (92); and in Areopagitica Milton delivers an eloquent "invitation to choose toward the virtuous self" (96).
El Dios cristiano, en su lectura areopagitica, es incognoscible, pero se puede conocer, dadas sus manifestaciones o procesiones; por tanto, hay correlacion, pues--para Peirce--"lo absolutamente incognoscible no existe".