Areopagus


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Areopagus

(ărēŏp`əgəs) [Gr.,=hill of Ares], rocky hill, 370 ft (113 m) high, NW of the Acropolis of Athens, famous as the sacred meeting place of the prime council of Athens. This council, also called the Areopagus, represented the ancient council of elders, which usually combined judicial and legislative functions from the beginning. The Areopagus represented in the 5th and 6th cent. B.C. the stronghold of aristocracy. Jurisdiction in murder cases had probably been given to it by Draco; Solon gave it various censorial powers over the officers of the state. The change in the method of choosing the archons in 487 B.C. caused the beginning of the decline of the Areopagus. In 480 B.C. the Areopagus enabled the manning of the fleet for the battle of Salamis, and it recovered much of its influence in the war years. But c.462 B.C. a series of attacks began and eventually the august council was reduced to the status of a court of homicide only, although it maintained its religious character. Pericles was a leader in this democratizing movement; Aeschylus was an opponent, and he brought his trilogy of dramas to a close (in The Eumenides) with an appeal for the preservation of the ancient traditions of the Areopagus.

Areopagus

 

organ of power in ancient Athens, named after the place where it held its sessions, on the Hill of Ares, near the Acropolis. The Areopagus came into being during the epoch of the tribal-clan system as a council of elders. Its members held office for life, and from the eighth century B.C. it was constituted entirely of former archons, who were nominated and elected by the Areopagus. It possessed broad political, juridical, supervisory, and religious powers. The Areopagus was a bulwark of the aristocracy and later of the oligarchy. Limitation of the Areopagus’ power began with the growth of the Athenian slaveholding democracy. The first attempts at limitation were made by Solon (sixth century B.C.); the reform of Ephialtes (462 B.C.) eliminated the political power and influence of the Areopagus, preserving only its functions as a court for trying certain criminal offenses and religious transgressions.

Areopagus

hill near the Acropolis used for Athenian council deliberations. [Gk. Hist.: Benét, 46]
See: Counsel

Areopagus

1. 
a. the hill to the northwest of the Acropolis in Athens
b. (in ancient Athens) the judicial council whose members (Areopagites) met on this hill
2. Literary any high court
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus Luke may have intended the reader to assume that there was some formal hearing, but the reality may still have been that a group of philosophers took Paul up onto the Areopagus for what amounted to a public debate.
Aeschylus has adapted the foundation myth of the Areopagus in a version that features the element of human deliberation.
It provides, in my view, a better point of contact for Hauerwasian theology with the agora and the Areopagus of America's particular, historically conditioned liberal democracy than most work in liberal democratic theory.
The gospel, however, penetrated even those reaches two millennia ago: Paul preached in the Areopagus of Christ crucified and resurrected, claiming that "in him we live, and move, and have our being" (Acts 17.
I refer to Paul's speech at the Areopagus (Acts 17: 22-34).
situated at an identifiable geographic spot, the Areopagus, Ares'
In the climactic scene of Acts, he journeys to Athens to speak in the Areopagus, the scene deliberately written to remind us of the trial of Socrates.
Sites include Philippi, Thessaloniki, Alexander's Pella, Athens with Acropolis and Areopagus, Corinth, Cenchreae, Patmos, Samos, Ephesus, Izmir (Smyrna), Pergamon, Akhisar (Thyatira), Sardis, Alasehir (Philadelphia) Laodicea, Colossae, Yalvac, (Antioch in Pisidia), Konya (Iconium), Galatia, Ankara, Istanbul.
The paradoxical affinities that research has managed to identify between the Epicurean philosophical 'sect' and the Christian sect in the early centuries of our era are recalled, then examined in detail in relation to the first document that attests to a specific encounter between the two sects, the narrative of the Acts of the Apostles, which shows Paul discussing with the Athens Epicureans and Stoics, then recovers for us Paul's speech before the Areopagus in Athens.
The trial of Orestes, charged with murdering his mother and her lover, was the first to be heard on the Areopagus.
202) The title Areopagitica derives from the Areopagus, or Hill or Ares, the meeting place of the Council of Elders in Athens, which tried cases involving homicide and treason.