Ares


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Ares

(âr`ēz), in Greek religion and mythology, Olympian god of war. He is usually said to be the son of Zeus and Hera; but in some legends he and Eris, his twin sister, were born when Hera touched a flower. A fierce warrior, he loved battle and often took part in conflicts between mortals. Ares killed Halirrhothios, son of Poseidon, when the youth violated his daughter, Alcippe. For this crime Ares was judged by a tribunal of the 12 Olympians and acquitted. The hill on which the trial took place, the Areopagus, was named for him. The worship of Ares was not as important as that of MarsMars,
in Roman religion and mythology, god of war. In early Roman times he was a god of agriculture, but in later religion (when he was identified with the Greek Ares) he was primarily associated with war.
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, with whom he was identified by the Romans.

Ares

[′er‚ēz]
(astronomy)
The planet Mars.

Ares

(Mars) god of war. [Gk. Myth.: Kravitz, 31]
See: War

Ares

Greek myth the god of war, born of Zeus and Hera

ARES

(language)
A pictorial query language.

["A Query Manipulation System for Image Data Retrieval", T. Ichikawa et al, Proc IEEE Workshop Picture Data Description and Management, Aug 1980, pp. 61-67].
References in classic literature ?
And further they are likely to have a bad effect on those who hear them; for everybody will begin to excuse his own vices when he is convinced that similar wickednesses are always being perpetrated by-- The kindred of the gods, the relatives of Zeus, whose ancestral altar, the attar of Zeus, is aloft in air on the peak of Ida, and who have the blood of deities yet flowing in their veins.
But now that we are determining what classes of subjects are or are not to be spoken of, let us see whether any have been omitted by us.
But we are not in a condition to answer this question at present, my friend.
Because, if I am not mistaken, we shall have to say that about men poets and story-tellers are guilty of making the gravest misstatements when they tell us that wicked men are often happy, and the good miserable; and that injustice is profitable when undetected, but that justice is a man's own loss and another's gain--these things we shall forbid them to utter, and command them to sing and say the opposite.
That such things are or are not to be said about men is a question which we cannot determine until we have discovered what justice is, and how naturally advantageous to the possessor, whether he seems to be just or not.
You are aware, I suppose, that all mythology and poetry is a narration of events, either past, present, or to come?
Or you may suppose the opposite case--that the intermediate passages are omitted, and the dialogue only left.
You have conceived my meaning perfectly; and if I mistake not, what you failed to apprehend before is now made clear to you, that poetry and mythology are, in some cases, wholly imitative-- instances of this are supplied by tragedy and comedy; there is likewise the opposite style, in which the my poet is the only speaker-- of this the dithyramb affords the best example; and the combination of both is found in epic, and in several other styles of poetry.
In saying this, I intended to imply that we must come to an understanding about the mimetic art,--whether the poets, in narrating their stories, are to be allowed by us to imitate, and if so, whether in whole or in part, and if the latter, in what parts; or should all imitation be prohibited?
Then the same person will hardly be able to play a serious part in life, and at the same time to be an imitator and imitate many other parts as well; for even when two species of imitation are nearly allied, the same persons cannot succeed in both, as, for example, the writers of tragedy and comedy--did you not just now call them imitations?
Yes, I did; and you are right in thinking that the same persons cannot succeed in both.
Neither are comic and tragic actors the same; yet all these things are but imitations.