Argenteuil


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Argenteuil

(ärzhäNtö`yə), city (1990 pop. 94,162), Val-d'Oise dept., N France, on the Seine, a suburb of Paris. It has important metalworks and factories making furniture, railroad and airplane parts, and chemicals. Once famous for its asparagus and grapes, industry and suburban housing have taken over the fields. It grew around a convent founded in the 7th cent.; there Heloise was educated and, after her misfortune, became prioress (see Abelard, PeterAbelard, Peter
, Fr. Pierre Abélard , 1079–1142, French philosopher and teacher, b. Le Pallet, near Nantes. Life

Abelard went (c.1100) to Paris to study under William of Champeaux at the school of Notre Dame and soon attacked the ultrarealist
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). The convent (later a monastery) was destroyed in the French Revolution; the famous relic, the Seamless Tunic, said to have been worn by Jesus, was given by Charlemagne to the convent and is now enshrined in Saint-Denis Basilica (1866).
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Argenteuil

a suburb of Paris, France, with a convent (656) that became famous when Héloïse was abbess (12th century). Pop.: 93 961 (1999)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Impressionists like Monet, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Gustave Caille-botte, Edouard Manet and Alfred Sisley painted in the town of Argenteuil, which, at the end of the 19th century, was popular with boating parties from Paris and famous for its white figs and asparagus.
And Monet was not alone in discovering the beauties of Argenteuil. Boudin, Caillebotte, Edouard Manet, Renoir and Alfred Sisley were all drawn to its meadows and river promenades.