Argive


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Related to Argive: Achaean, ontologist, Achæan

Argive

1. (in Homer, Virgil, etc.) of or relating to the Greeks besieging Troy, esp those from Argos
2. of or relating to Argos or Argolis
3. a literary word for Greek
4. an ancient Greek, esp one from Argos or Argolis
References in periodicals archive ?
When the chorus of Argive women emerge after line hi, they share a passage of lyric dialogue (kommos) with Electra in mutual lamentation of her troubling circumstances (112-66).
From there, the terrestrial route passed either through to the Argive Plain and thence to Mycenae, or through the Korinthia and hence south through the Berbati Valley to Mycenae.
Both the Argive and Roman armies are marching to undertake an impious war; both armies are prevented by an important river associated with the country's borders; (29) in both cases, one man leads the rest of the army over.
In another sense, his devotion can be seen as an attempt to free the Argive community of responsibility for its collective guilt through its association with him.' Clogan (2009: 80-81, 85) also notes the 'pietas' of Maeon and Menoeceus but views Amphiaraus, whom he sees as 'guiltless,' much more positively than I do.
She urges Athena to help her prevent a premature homecoming for the Greeks, lest they "leave as a boast for Priam and the Trojans Argive Helen, for whose sake many (polloi) Achaeans have perished at Troy, far from their dear fatherland." (7)
Some Argive envoys reached Samos to assure the Athenians of Argos' loyalty.
Even after one determines that nebbe is a Middle English term for beak (or metaphorically a mouth or the nub of a pen) and considers that tartan i might find origins in the Mongolian steppes or Argive underworld, the lines are not easily parsed into paraphrase.
(30) Here too, amusingly, Tisamenos doubles the demand (although he wants only citizenship, not Melampous' Argive kingship), escalates his wage-demand, so that his brother also be granted Spartan citizenship.
This passage comes from the first stasimon (vv.321-327) of the Orestes, where the Chorus of Argive women beseeches the Eumenides to release Orestes from his torments.
The holy bard, calming those tormented souls with his song, shall make immortal the Argive princes through all lands embraced by the great father Oceanus.)
In fact, it had been a monument of the Kings of Argos that originally housed ten bronze statues of Argive rulers who claimed lineage from Heracles.
He addresses Patroclus in Book 16 as he prepares to send Patroclus into battle in his place and imagines a terrifying final state of victory in which he and Patroclus are the sole survivors: Oh would to god--Father Zeus, Athena, and lord Apollo-- not one of all these Trojans could flee his death, not one, no Argive either, but we could stride from the slaughter so we could bring Troy's hallowed crown of towers toppling down around us--you and I alone!