Argive

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Related to Argives: Argos, Danaans

Argive

1. (in Homer, Virgil, etc.) of or relating to the Greeks besieging Troy, esp those from Argos
2. of or relating to Argos or Argolis
3. a literary word for Greek
4. an ancient Greek, esp one from Argos or Argolis
References in periodicals archive ?
1046; you liberated the entire city of the Argives), all in reference to Orestes's potential vengeance on Klutaimestra and Aigisthos.
3.337, Asopus is identified as the border between the Thebans and Argives.
Dante essentially portrays Amphiaraus as a deserter who flees the battlefield, much as Statius initially portrays him (when he flees his responsibility to tell the Argives their fate), and Amphiaraus's contrapasso in the Inferno, while it suits his sin of soothsaying, could as easily fit the act of desertion: 'Mira c'ha fatto petto de le spalle; / perche volse veder troppo davante, / di retro guarda e fa retroso calle' ('Look at the one who has made a chest of his back; because he turned to see too much ahead, backward he looks and makes a backward path'; Inferno 20.
The city was founded by the Argives and subsequently passed through Hellenistic, Roman and Christian periods.
(59) Kagan believes that the Athenians were committed to helping the Argives, out of the obligation the latter's presence in Sicily entailed.
In both, the chains were attached to a rock, and in both, beasts were the torturers--his from the air, and hers from the sea; their deliverers were Argives of the same family, his Hercules and hers Perseus; the one shooting Zeus's eagle and the other contending with the sea-beast of Poseidon.
Agora se eu tivesse a coragem de contradizer Homero antes de Argives e mostrar os erros em sua poesia em relacao as coisas mais importantes, talvez fosse natural se irritarem comigo e expulsar-me da cidade se vissem que eu estava dissipando e destruindo a reputacao que a sua cidade herdou provenientes dessa fonte.
(12) The author informs us that although the city had been destroyed by the Argives in the 8th century BC, the sanctuary was spared and went on as the religious centre of the region.
In Book Four of the Odyssey, Menelaus relates that while he and his comrades were hidden in the Trojan horse within the walls of Troy, Helen approached them and once again gave each soldier's name: Three times you walked around the hollow ambush, feeling it, and you called out, naming them by name, to the best of the Danaans, and made your voice sound like the voice of the wife of each of the Argives. Now I myself and the son of Tydeus and great Odysseus were sitting there in the middle of them and we heard you crying aloud, and Diomedes and I started up, both minded to go outside, or else to answer your voice from inside, but Odysseus pulled us back and held us, for all our eagerness.
For we know all that the Argives and Trojans suffered on the broad plain of Troy by the will of the gods, and we know whatever happens on this fruitful earth" This was the sweet song the Sirens sang, and my heart was filled with such a longing to listen that I ordered my men to set me free.
Both Samians and Argives claimed that their imposing temples of Hera were at the birthplace of the queen of heaven (Olalla 2002) and at both sites, soil is thick, clayey and high in alumina (Xeralf) compared with other soils.
Suddenly steps forth a remarkable, puzzling figure: "Thersites of the endless speech," who "knew within his head many words, but disorderly;/vain, and without decency, to quarrel with the princes/with any word he thought might be amusing to the Argives" (2.212-215).