Argonne

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Argonne

(ärgôn`), region of the Paris basin, NE France, in Champagne and Lorraine (Meuse, Marne, and Ardennes dept.), a hilly and woody district centering around the capital, Sainte-Menehould. Thinly populated, with unimportant cultivation and only small industries, it has been of strategic significance. There, in 1792, the French repulsed the Prussians. The sector was a battleground throughout World War I. In the Allied victory drive (Sept.–Nov., 1918), the Meuse-Argonne sector was carried by the Americans.

Argonne

the. a wooded region of NE France: scene of major battles in both World Wars
References in periodicals archive ?
Army launched its greatest attack of the war in the Argonne Forest on 26 September 1918 until the conclusion of hostilities on 11 November, the regiment worked tirelessly to open major roads to support the effort.
In October 1918, in the Argonne Forest of France, the 78th Infantry Division came under heavy German machine gun and artillery fire, forcing American troops to jump into a nearby river for cover.
He suffered in the Argonne forest with near-frozen feet due to ill-fitting boots and was hospitalized at Verdun with his best friend Roy Cory, both victims of mustard-gas poisoning.
Because of conscription (the military draft), in the 20" century alone hundreds of thousands have fallen victim to the altruism-collectivism-statism ethic, from the Argonne Forest to the Vietnam jungles, in Holzer's view.
Unlike most World War I histories of American involvement in the "Great War," Grotelueschen's book goes beyond the well known stories of Belleau Wood and the Argonne Forest to describe how the AEF adapted to combat in France.
Consisting of roughly 550 men, the 307th was isolated by German forces in the Argonne Forest in October 1918, and lost nearly 200 men.
From Valley Forge to the battlefields of Gettysburg; from the Argonne Forest to the shores of Normandy; from the rice paddies of Korea and Vietnam to the mountains of Afghanistan and the streets of Baghdad; our military history is rich with the willingness of generation after generation to live by the Warrior Ethos.