Aristaeus


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Aristaeus

(ărĭstē`əs), in Greek mythology, son of Apollo and Cyrene, especially honored as the inventor of beekeeping. Aristaeus tried to violate Eurydice, wife of Orpheus. Eurydice was fatally bitten by a snake while fleeing him. As punishment, the nymphs, who had previously been his mentors, caused all his bees to die. However, he sacrificed several cattle in atonement, and from their carcasses new swarms of bees were generated. Learned in the arts of medicine and soothsaying, Aristaeus wandered through many lands teaching his skills and curing the sick. He came to be widely worshiped as a beneficent deity.

Aristaeus

honored as inventor of beekeeping. [Gk. Myth.: NCE, 105]
See: Farming
References in periodicals archive ?
(17) Aristaeus does as his mother instructs, seizing and binding Proteus, who uses his craft (artis) to change himself into flames, water, and beasts, but all in vain.
As critics have noted, the "fiumana" is a reference to Virgil's Georgies 4 and more precisely to the Aristaeus's episode.
He is portrayed moreover as Aristaeus, the god of the bees, in a familiar statue originally from Rome (now in the Louvre), while at Lanuvium, where a temple was built to him, he was commemorated with Diana by the members of a funerary college.
Year Species Total Aristaeopsis Aristaeomorpha Aristaeus edwardsiana foliacea antillensis 2002 13.021 - - 13.021 2003 58.928 4.585 475 63.988 2004 81.585 14.861 5.489 101.935 2005 182.633 42.568 15.828 241.029 2006 99.325 51.756 5.365 156.446 2007 40.231 8.896 774 49.901 2008 53.021 21.604 434 75.059 2009 13.703 3.831 172 17.706 Total 542.447 148.101 28.537 719.085 Source of information: Grupo de Estudos Pesqueiros (Universidade do Vale do Itajai) Table 5.
(48) This is important to keep in mind when reading the story of Aristaeus and his bees.
The atmosphere in Georgics 4.561 is much more optimistic: Aristaeus' bees have been resurrected and the death of Eurydice has been expiated.
Here Vergil invests numerous lines to describing a specific epyllion, or short epic, concerning how the character, Aristaeus, reclaims his bees.
The ghost of Actaeon appeared in a dream to his father Aristaeus, and begged him not to punish the dogs, saying Father, forgive them; for they knew not what they did.
Particularly glaring is the failure to address the structure and characteristics of the epyllion in Book 4, the story of how the mythic agricultural hero Aristaeus lost and recovered his bees.
The ancient Greeks credited Aristaeus, a son of Apollo and Cyrene, with its discovery, and it is mentioned in the Old Testament.
This narrative takes the form of an epyllion (so that the framing account of Aristaeus' quest to replace his bees, and the inset Orpheus material as sung by the seer Proteus, constitute a single narrative unit), and seems always to have presented a challenge to interpretation.
(12) The phonetic parallelism of Odette and odalisque is itself worthy of note, nor is this an isolated example of such sound patterning: Swann's association with the aristocracy, for example, is conveyed through a parallel with the Aristaeus of classical mythology (Aristee/ aristocrate).