Aristaeus


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Related to Aristaeus: Troilus

Aristaeus

(ărĭstē`əs), in Greek mythology, son of Apollo and Cyrene, especially honored as the inventor of beekeeping. Aristaeus tried to violate Eurydice, wife of Orpheus. Eurydice was fatally bitten by a snake while fleeing him. As punishment, the nymphs, who had previously been his mentors, caused all his bees to die. However, he sacrificed several cattle in atonement, and from their carcasses new swarms of bees were generated. Learned in the arts of medicine and soothsaying, Aristaeus wandered through many lands teaching his skills and curing the sick. He came to be widely worshiped as a beneficent deity.

Aristaeus

honored as inventor of beekeeping. [Gk. Myth.: NCE, 105]
See: Farming
References in periodicals archive ?
11) Having lost all his bees Aristaeus is desperate and by the river Pineus he calls for help to his mother Cyrene, a river goddess.
He is portrayed moreover as Aristaeus, the god of the bees, in a familiar statue originally from Rome (now in the Louvre), while at Lanuvium, where a temple was built to him, he was commemorated with Diana by the members of a funerary college.
Year Species Total Aristaeopsis Aristaeomorpha Aristaeus edwardsiana foliacea antillensis 2002 13.
Faced with the loss of his bees, Aristaeus utters a riverside complaint to his mother Cyrene and is promptly escorted to her underwater bower by her nymphs.
12) The phonetic parallelism of Odette and odalisque is itself worthy of note, nor is this an isolated example of such sound patterning: Swann's association with the aristocracy, for example, is conveyed through a parallel with the Aristaeus of classical mythology (Aristee/ aristocrate).
In Georgics 4, the beekeeper Aristaeus is a quasi-imperial hero (for Roman readers, bees were symbols of monarchical societies).
Aristaeus, writing in his Letters during the second century A.
Resurrection is a rather misleading word, because this is not the same swarm as the one Aristaeus lost; yet one hive of bees is interchangeable with another, unlike the lost Eurydice, who is, for Orpheus, irreplaceable.
During the festivities, Euridice, walking abroad with her friends, the nymphs, is assailed by the jealous Aristaeus.
Actaeon In Greek mythology, son of the god Aristaeus and Autonoe (daughter of Cadmus, the founder of Thebes in Boeotia); he was a Boeotian hero and hunter.
In Vergil's work, Eurydice is bitten by a snake as she flees the lustful rustic deity, Aristaeus.