Aristides

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Aristides

(ărĭstī`dēz), d. c.468 B.C., Athenian statesman and general. He was one of the 10 generals who commanded the Athenians at the battle of Marathon (490 B.C.) and in the next year became chief archon. In 483 he was ostracized because he opposed the naval policy of Themistocles. However, in 480 Aristides fought beside his countrymen at Salamis, and the following year he commanded the Athenian army at the battle of Plataea. Later he organized the finances of the Delian League. He is a classic example of probity in public life and was called Aristides the Just.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Aristides

 

Born circa 540 B.C.; died circa 467 B.C. Athenian political and military leader during the period of the Greco-Persian Wars (500–449 B.C.).

Initially in his political career Aristides was an advocate of Cleisthenes’ democratic reforms. In 490 he took part as a strategos in the Battle of Marathon, and in 489 he was elected archon. After 490, expressing the views of the major landowning aristocracy and the rural population, who demanded that the military land forces be strengthened, Aristides spoke out against Themistocles. The latter, as the head of the most democratic merchant and artisan class, was advocating a plan for creating a naval fleet. In 483–482, after the triumph of Themistocles, Aristides was ostracized (that is, exiled from Athens). But in 480, when the law regarding exiles was abrogated, Aristides was granted amnesty. He took part in the Battle of Salamis, leading the hoplite landing force which captured the island of Psyttaleia. In 479 he commanded the Athenians at the Battle of Plataea. In the 470’s Aristides attained great political influence, heading an oligarchic group. He was one of the organizers of the Delian League.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Geschichte und Teologie eines okumenischen Problems (Gottingen: Vandenhoeck & Rupert, 2001); Aristeides Papadakis, Crisis in Byzantium: The Filioque Controversy in the Patriarchate of Gregory II of Cyprus (1283-1289) (New York: Fordham University Press, 1983; Crestwood, NY: St.
Attempts to attribute the spurcum additamentum to a Milesian Tale by Sisenna, (39) which would have been inserted accidentally into Apuleius' text later, would at least provide us with the suggestion that the original of the 'Pasiphae'-scene could be attributed to Sisenna's forerunner Aristeides. Mariotti, (40) however, definitely proves that the spurcum additamentum must be mediaeval, denying it a possible early date on linguistic grounds and linking it with 11th century medical literature, a view corroborated by Zimmerman 2000 and Hunink 2006.
It owes perhaps most to an inference drawn from Thucydides, who records as one stipulation of the Peace of Nikias that six cities in the north that had revolted from Athens were to be required to pay "the tribute of Aristeides" (5.18.5).
Astin, Scipio Aemilianus, Oxford, 1967, 36, 53, 280-1; Yann Le Bohec, Histoire militaire des guerres puniques, Monaco, 1995, 311, estimates over 55,000 survivors; Huss, Geschichte, 455-6 n.133; Plutarch, Lives of Aristeides and Cato, 157.
[At any rate no legal speech is extant of any of those who lived before him, nor even of his contemporaries, because speech-writing was not yet in vogue, not of Themistocles, Aristeides, or Pericles.]
Herodotos 9.28.6 and Plutarch Aristeides 11.1: 8,000 Athenians at Plataia in 479 B.C.
tychides, I on the other hand praise Aristeides, the one best man to come
Echoes of the same tradition are also found in some passages of Plutarch's lives of Aristeides and of Kimon.
(15.) For a discussion of Caeseropapism during Byzantium, see Aristeides Papadakis, "The Historical Tradition of Church-State Relations Under Orthodoxy," in Eastern Christianity and Politics in the Twentieth Century, vol.
1) (67) is his abhorrence of the dancer as a "pernicious," "lethal" man ([LANGUAGE NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], 5) an attitude entirely commensurate not only with the widespread ancient perception of the stage-performer as the epitome of lewdness (impudicitia) but also with the deep-seated, crosscultural vilification of the stage as the breeding ground of lechery and wickedness, vices whose sinful spillage risked contaminating even those "that came honest to a play." (68) So, for example, in Aelius Aristeides' view, as recorded by Libanius (Or.