Aristippus


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Related to Aristippus: Antisthenes, Epicurus

Aristippus

(ărĭstĭp`əs), c.435–c.360 B.C., Greek philosopher of Cyrene, first of the CyrenaicsCyrenaics
, one of the minor schools of Greek philosophy, flourishing in the late 4th and early 3d cent. B.C. Cyrenaic philosophy taught that present individual pleasure is the highest good.
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. He held pleasure to be the highest good and virtue to be identical with the ability to enjoy. His doctrines, comprising the first coherent exposition of hedonismhedonism
[Gr.,=pleasure], the doctrine that holds that pleasure is the highest good. Ancient hedonism expressed itself in two ways: the cruder form was that proposed by Aristippus and the early Cyrenaics, who believed that pleasure was achieved by the complete gratification of
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, opposed those of the Cynics, although both groups drew upon aspects of Socratic philosophy.
References in periodicals archive ?
20 John Watson Hedonistic theories from Aristippus to Spencer (New York: Macmillan 1895)
Again, as if to highlight the point, Plato has Echecrates ask whether Aristippus and Cleombrotus were there, to which Phaedo answers in the negative.
This discussion is sandwiched between readings of Thomas Randolph's Cambridge comedy Aristippus and the three productions for King Charles's visit to Oxford in 1636: William Cartwright's The Royal Slave, William Strode's The Floating Island, and George Wilde's Love's Hospital.
(34) Thomas Randolph's play Aristippus, performed at Cambridge University, offers a hilarious, dense, extended contribution to the "drinking college" or "school of vice" tradition that parodies customs in vogue at the university as it glorifies the drinking of sack wine and eschews the "heresy of beer".
One of the earliest philosophers to do so was Aristippus of Cyrene (435-356BC) who spent his life in Athens and was a disciple of Socrates.
The notion of indifference plays a more important role in the early Greek hedonist school of the Cyrenaics, founded by Aristippus of Cyrene, who held that sensations can be subsumed into the three categories of pleasure, pain, and indifference, depending on whether the impulse is gentle, violent, or calm.
Na Grecia antiga, quatro seculos antes de Cristo, o filosofo Aristippus afirmava que "o objetivo central da vida de cada ser humano seria maximizar seus prazeres" (Nettle, 2005).
From the ancient roots of Aristippus' (Carr, 2004) hedonic approach to happiness, popularized by Seligman (2002), to the 6 factor approach to wellbeing proposed by Ryff and Keys (1995), we have demonstrated a curiosity, indeed a passion, for getting to grips with these concepts.
a4r-v "Aristippus of Cyrene forged lascivious poems about loose women and boys, which he attributed to [Socrates, Xenophon, and Plato].
Plato and Aristippus); it is certainly an effect of the anecdote, but perhaps not the intent behind Alexander's offer.
bill," Brome, The Damoiselle (1638); Fletcher, The Elder Brother (1625); Randolph, Aristippus (1626); "discharge ...
Aristippus, Zeno, and some early Greek libertarians motivated others to action.