Aristippus


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Related to Aristippus: Antisthenes, Epicurus

Aristippus

(ărĭstĭp`əs), c.435–c.360 B.C., Greek philosopher of Cyrene, first of the CyrenaicsCyrenaics
, one of the minor schools of Greek philosophy, flourishing in the late 4th and early 3d cent. B.C. Cyrenaic philosophy taught that present individual pleasure is the highest good.
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. He held pleasure to be the highest good and virtue to be identical with the ability to enjoy. His doctrines, comprising the first coherent exposition of hedonismhedonism
[Gr.,=pleasure], the doctrine that holds that pleasure is the highest good. Ancient hedonism expressed itself in two ways: the cruder form was that proposed by Aristippus and the early Cyrenaics, who believed that pleasure was achieved by the complete gratification of
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, opposed those of the Cynics, although both groups drew upon aspects of Socratic philosophy.
References in periodicals archive ?
Aristippus and Cleombrotus were said to be in Aegina (59c4).
The notion of indifference plays a more important role in the early Greek hedonist school of the Cyrenaics, founded by Aristippus of Cyrene, who held that sensations can be subsumed into the three categories of pleasure, pain, and indifference, depending on whether the impulse is gentle, violent, or calm.
Na Grecia antiga, quatro seculos antes de Cristo, o filosofo Aristippus afirmava que "o objetivo central da vida de cada ser humano seria maximizar seus prazeres" (Nettle, 2005).
aboue cited redeth thus, Diogenes Syracusis, cum olera ei lauanti Aristippus dixisset, Si Dionysio adulari uelles, ista non esses: Imo inquit, si tu Dionysium non adulares, illan non esses.
bill," Brome, The Damoiselle (1638); Fletcher, The Elder Brother (1625); Randolph, Aristippus (1626); "discharge .
Aristippus, Zeno, and some early Greek libertarians motivated others to action.
14) Cyrenaicism was a school of philosophy founded by Aristippus of Cyrene, a former associate of Socrates, in the late fourth to early third century B.
Aristippus of Cyrene was one of Socrates' associates; he appears in Xenophon's Memorabilia, where in 2.
Bezanson notes that in Clarel the hymn of Aristippus by the young Cypriot "starts the interesting series of rose images (beauty, love, life) that partly counter the recent aura of sin and death" (794-95n).
Describing Aristippus as a "Greek philosopher of hedonism" without explaining what hedonism is provides scant enlightenment for most undergraduates.
Why, Plato asks, are Terpsion, Aristippus, and Euclid, who had been present during their master's last hours, incapable of telling him in precise terms what had been said on that final day?
This comment opens the way to a list of thirty-four witty remarks; all but three of which are taken from Diogenes Laertes's (1925) lives of Aristippus the Cyrenaic, Diogenes the Cynic, and Bion, although many are modified for Machiavelli's own purposes.