Aristolochia


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

Aristolochia

 

a genus of plants of the family Aristolochiaceae (birthwort). The plants are perennial herbs, often with climbing stems, and woody lianas. The leaves are alternate and cordate. The flowers are in the axil. The perianth, which is irregular, corolliform, tubular, and inflated at the base, generally has an entire ligulate fold at the top. There are six stamens, adnate to the style. The flowers are adapted for cross-pollination by insects. There are approximately 350 species (according to other data, up to 500), distributed in the tropical and, more rarely, temperate regions. In the USSR there are seven species, the best-known being Aristolochia clematitis, which grows in the forests, thickets, and meadows of the Caucasus and the central and southern European USSR; this species is poisonous. Dutchman’s-pipe (A. macrophylla, formerly A. sipho) is cultivated as an ornamental climbing plant.

References in periodicals archive ?
Seven cases, similar to the Belgian cases, were identified in France, corresponding to exposure to botanical preparations contaminated with Aristolochia fangchi from 1989 to 1992.
Characterization of the aqueous extract of the root of Aristolochia indica: Evaluation of its traditional use as an antidote for snake bites.
Palabras clave: Aristolochia, clasificaciones filogeneticas, clasificaciones lineanas, Euglypha, Holostylis, floristica en Sur America, sistematica filogenetica.
The botanical species that we studied include: lima bean seedlings; the heavy cordate vine Aristolochia macrophylla (Dutchman's Pipe); Swedish ivy; Mimosa pudica L.
For example, the Chinese herb Aristolochia fangchi has been reported to increase urothelial carcinoma among patients with end-stage Chinese herb nephropathy.
With a wingspan of eight inches and a diet consisting solely of the South American aristolochia plant, the species has proved to be a demanding guest at the Eaglescliffe sanctuary.
Virginia Snakeroot, Aristolochia serpentaria, has spread throughout the old frontier territories and presents a deadly danger.
Health officials have banned the sale or prescription of 151 herbal preparations, some containing aristolochia which has been blamed for causing kidney failure in two British women.
In one case, two women suffered serious kidney trouble when they were given Aristolochia instead of the harmless Stephania.
The US Federal Drug Administration is planning to stop the import of herbs in the Aristolochia family because it had caused kidney failure in Belgium and in Britain, where the herb was being used to treat a skin condition.