Aristolochiaceae


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Related to Aristolochiaceae: family Aristolochiaceae

Aristolochiaceae

[ə‚ris·tə‚lō·kē′ās·ē‚ē]
(botany)
The single family of the plant order Aristolochiales.

Aristolochiaceae

 

a family of dicotyledonous plants. They are perennial herbs and woody lianas; more rarely, they are erect shrubs and shrublets. The leaves are alternate, entire, and exstipulate; infrequently they are three- to five-lobed. The flowers are solitary or in inflorescences; they are often carrion-scented. There are between seven and ten genera (approximately 600 species), found primarily in the tropics and subtropics. In the USSR there are ten species of the genera Aristolochia and Asarum. Some Aristolochiaceae are cultivated as ornamentals.

REFERENCE

Takhtadzhian, A. L. Sistema i filogeniia tsvetkovykh rastenii. Moscow-Leningrad, 1966.
References in periodicals archive ?
The genus Aristolochia (Aristolochiaceae) is found in wide areas, from the tropics to temperate zones and consists of about 400 species.
f AY095465 Piperales Aristolochiaceae Aristolochia macrophylla Lam.
1 h 1 0 Schefflera sprucei h 7 1 (Seem.) Harms Schefflera ulei Harms h 0 1 Aristolochiaceae Aristolochia sp.
In Belgium, at least 70 people required renal transplant or dialysis for interstitial fibrosis of the kidney after taking the wrong herb from the Aristolochiaceae family, again as a dietary aid.
The spicebush swallowtail (Papilio troilus (L.)) feeds on spicebush (Lindera benzoin (L.) Blume) and sassafras (Sassafras albidum (Nutt.) Nees, Lauraceae), while the pipevine swallowtail (Battus philenor (L.)) feeds on pipevines (Aristolochia spp., Aristolochiaceae).
The birthwort family (Aristolochiaceae) contains more than 400 species, most of them tropical and subtropical, but only has a single species that grows in the southern taiga, asarabacca (Asarum europaeum).
The effect of native vegetation on the susceptibility of Aristolochia reticulata (Aristolochiaceae) to herbivore attack.
Ehrlich and Raven (1964) regarded it most likely that the ancestral host plant family was Aristolochiaceae. In contrast, Scott (1986) noted that Fabaceae were eaten by the most basal branches of several butterfly families and suggested that the ancestral host probably was a legume.
Parsimony optimization implies that the ovary was at least partly inferior; the combination of free carpels and adnation of other parts to them is rare in living plants, but it does occur (e.g., in Saruma, Aristolochiaceae: Dickison, 1992).