Aristotelian

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Aristotelian

1. of or relating to Aristotle (384--322 bc), the Greek philosopher or his philosophy
2. (of a philosophical position) derived from that of Aristotle, or incorporating such of his major doctrines as the distinctions between matter and form, and substance and accident, or the primacy of individuals over universals
References in periodicals archive ?
For instance, Aristotle's account of pleasure is both textually complicated (because of the dual accounts in Nicomachean Ethics 7 and 10) and interscholastically complicated (because of the initial rivalry between Aristotelian and Epicurean schools in the third century B.C.E.).
This short book addresses the question of scientific explanation in the Aristotelian context.
He became convinced that a new orientation must be found and implemented because the politically dominant Western European peoples had, in his view, exhausted their capacity to learn through experience; their Aristotelian (2)metalinguistic patterns, like Euclidean or Newtonian physics, were operative only within narrow limits, and human experience had strayed into areas beyond the functional capacities of those pattems.
Now Aristotelians can happily grant that virtue does not always benefit us, since a virtuous act can impede future virtuous activity, say by crippling or killing the agent.
The third and longest part of the book is devoted to "Catholic Renaissance Aristotelianism," which Salatowsky divides into two groups: the "radical Aristotelians" on the one side--which means here the Paduan philosophers, mainly Jacobus Zabarella and Simone Portio--and the "Jesuits" on the other, represented by Franciscus Toletus and the commentaries from the Jesuit college at Coimbra.
Rather, from Yu's own description, it appears that Mencius provides an ascending philosophical complement to Confucius's descending (revelatory) religious tradition; he does so in a way strikingly similar, at least on the conceptual level, to the work of Christian Aristotelians during the Middle Ages.
93), and she concludes that the conventional opposition between Augustinians and Aristotelians is not quite warranted.
Newton's predecessors, such as Galileo, Kepler and Hooke, were moving away from the Aristotelian world view, in which the behavior of objects is dictated by the "qualities" they possess; Aristotelians believed, for example, that a stone falls because its "nature" necessitates that it move toward the center of the universe, or that planets travel in circular orbits because the circle is a heavenly form.
Minimalist Aristotelians such as Armstrong argue that admitting uninstantiated universals in any way at all would be excessively Platonist, as acknowledging a realm of forms beyond the real world, ungrounded in any true reality.
Monfasani rightly underscores Ficino's reluctance to enter into the fray while at the same time stressing elements of concord between the "old" Aristotelians and Platonism (as opposed to the Averroist reading of the Stagirite that was eliciting such debate in contemporary circles).
Do these interpretations mostly interest Aristotelians or Heideggerians?
Descartes' quarrels with philosophical friends such as Henricus LeRoy and such powerful enemies such as Gisbertus Voetius grew from personal struggles to great and public controversies, pitting Aristotelians against Cartesians of various stripes, each side battling for control of the scientific and philosophical curricula of the republic's newly established universities.