Aristotelian

(redirected from Aristotelians)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal.

Aristotelian

1. of or relating to Aristotle (384--322 bc), the Greek philosopher or his philosophy
2. (of a philosophical position) derived from that of Aristotle, or incorporating such of his major doctrines as the distinctions between matter and form, and substance and accident, or the primacy of individuals over universals
References in periodicals archive ?
For instance, Aristotle's account of pleasure is both textually complicated (because of the dual accounts in Nicomachean Ethics 7 and 10) and interscholastically complicated (because of the initial rivalry between Aristotelian and Epicurean schools in the third century B.
This short book addresses the question of scientific explanation in the Aristotelian context.
He became convinced that a new orientation must be found and implemented because the politically dominant Western European peoples had, in his view, exhausted their capacity to learn through experience; their Aristotelian (2)metalinguistic patterns, like Euclidean or Newtonian physics, were operative only within narrow limits, and human experience had strayed into areas beyond the functional capacities of those pattems.
Ever since Myles Burnyeat's 1992 essay on Aristotle's psychology of perception, there has been a broad agreement that the Aristotelian tradition has quite a different agenda from the Cartesian one when it comes to questions of mind, body, and soul.
But the difference should not seriously affect the arguments to follow, for all Aristotelians take well-being to consist at least primarily in virtuous activity.
Rather, from Yu's own description, it appears that Mencius provides an ascending philosophical complement to Confucius's descending (revelatory) religious tradition; he does so in a way strikingly similar, at least on the conceptual level, to the work of Christian Aristotelians during the Middle Ages.
Again in line with the Aristotelians, al-Sijzi only recognizes that conception which is 'essential' and revealed by way of a rational intuition or expressed in a definition.
Lisska's repristination of Aristotelian teleology may be within speaking distance of neo-Aristotelians like Martha Nussbaum, but it is not going to persuade the likes of Richard Rorty or Dworkin.
93), and she concludes that the conventional opposition between Augustinians and Aristotelians is not quite warranted.
The Onufs identify the Federalists as Aristotelians (particularly James Madison) and focus on Aristotle's notions of polis and politeis, city or political community and constitution, respectively.
Newton's predecessors, such as Galileo, Kepler and Hooke, were moving away from the Aristotelian world view, in which the behavior of objects is dictated by the "qualities" they possess; Aristotelians believed, for example, that a stone falls because its "nature" necessitates that it move toward the center of the universe, or that planets travel in circular orbits because the circle is a heavenly form.
Minimalist Aristotelians such as Armstrong argue that admitting uninstantiated universals in any way at all would be excessively Platonist, as acknowledging a realm of forms beyond the real world, ungrounded in any true reality.