Armagnac

(redirected from Armagnacs)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to Armagnacs: Armagnacs and Burgundians

Armagnac

(ärmänyäk`), region and former county, SW France, in GasconyGascony
, Fr. Gascogne, region of SW France. It is now coextensive with the departments of Landes, Gers, and Hautes-Pyrénées and parts of Pyrénées-Atlantiques, Lot-et-Garonne, Tarn-et-Garonne, Haute-Garonne, Gironde, and Ariège.
..... Click the link for more information.
, roughly coextensive with Gers dept. AuchAuch
, town (1990 pop. 24,728), capital of Gers dept., SW France, in Gascony, on the Gers River. It is a farm market and commercial center with a variety of manufactures and an important trade in Armagnac brandy, poultry, wine, and grain.
..... Click the link for more information.
 is the chief town. Armagnac is famous for the brandy bearing the same name. The counts of Armagnac originated in the 10th cent. as vassals of the dukes of Gascony. Their power reached its height with Count Bernard VII, who dominated France in the early 15th cent. Margaret of Angoulême, sister of Francis I of France, married the last count of Armagnac, who died without issue. Armagnac eventually passed to her second husband, Henri d'Albret, king of Navarre, whose grandson became King Henry IV. Henry added Armagnac to the royal domain in 1607.
References in periodicals archive ?
Armagnac is a kind of brandy produced in the Armagnac region in the southwest of France.
Sips and small talk will make you learn that Armagnac is made from the Folle Blance, a grape from the Armagnac region; or sometimes from a Colombard, a French wine grape; or now even a baco blanc grape, a French-American hybrid grape variety.
He travels annually to France to select Cognac, Armagnac and Calvados barrels for their private use.
Armagnac, produced in the Armagnac region in Gascony, southwest France, makes interesting as a cocktail ingredient, according to Volger.
It therefore makes perfect sense to clearly show and educate the consumer that, even though Armagnac falls into the brandy category, traditionally served as a digestif, it can also be enjoyed as an aperitif in the same way as one would savour a malt whisky.
For brandy connoisseurs, there is Armagnac, France's premier brandy.
For more than 600 years, Armagnac has been aged in oak barrels, its artisanal recipe handed down through the generations among a small group of family-owned estates.
Lockwood Restaurant at The Palmer House in Chicagoserves two brandies ($10 and $12), 12 Cognacs priced $12 to $70, and one Armagnac ($15).
And Nicholas Laberdolive will be on hand to answer questions about his famous armagnacs.
Only France, however, produces brandies as distinctive as Cognac and Armagnac.
A panel of experts including Armagnac ambassador May Matta-Aliah, EWG Spirits & Wine brands portfolio director Audrey Fort, CEO/founder of Perigee Spirits Charles Henri de Bournet, Otis Florence of the New York bar Pouring Ribbons, and author/journalist Jason Wilson explored grape-based spirits and cocktails.
The international brandy category (Cognac, as well as Armagnac, are regional French brandies made under specific conditions) continues to do well, say experts, due to a variety of influences: the high advertising profile of the four major Cognac brands and their domination of the luxury category, the relative smoothness and mellowness of brandies compared to, say, straight whiskies and Scotches; brandy's mixability, the growing connection with the urban markets in general and African-Americans in Particular, and the occasional appearance in the pop culture scene of leading brands (A major rap hit earlier this year, "Pass the Courvoisier," is said to have helped drive that brand's sales.