Armillaria root rot

Armillaria root rot

[‚är·mə¦lar·ē·ə ′rüt ‚rät]
(plant pathology)
A fungus disease of forest and orchard trees initiated by invasion of the root system, then of the lower trunk, by Armillaria mellea. Also known as bark-splitting disease.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture has partnered with Clemson University, Michigan State University, University of Georgia and the University of Georgia Cooperative Extension to evaluate short and long-term solutions for Armillaria Root Rot affecting forest and fruit tree crops;
We're trying to solve the puzzle of how to clobber Armillaria root rot, with its telltale mushrooms and perturbing ability to defy conventional soil-cleansing tactics.
3 BOOTLACE FUNGUS - at this time of year this fungus, known alternatively as honey fungus or Armillaria root rot, is showing itself as large clusters of honey-coloured toadstools, often around the bases of old tree stumps.
Mushrooms under a tree could be a sign of armillaria root rot, commonly known as oak root fungus.
Just as important is the increasing awareness that new rootstocks are needed for a variety of sites with soil-borne pests and problems such as: root knot and nematode complexes; fanleaf degeneration; Armillaria root rot (oak root fungus); phytophthora; drought; and saline soils.
It may come as no surprise that the final player in the oak's demise is often a fungus, in this case Armillariella mellea, the cause of Armillaria root rot.