Dolmetsch

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Dolmetsch

Arnold. 1858--1940, British musician, born in France. He contributed greatly to the revival of interest in early music and instruments
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MICHALA PETRI AT GREGYNOG, JUNE 17 The Danish virtuoso, arguably the finest recorder player in the world, makes a rare UK visit to honour Arnold Dolmetsch, the man who reinvented the recorder and spearheaded the early music revival.
It had been revived by Arnold Dolmetsch (1858-1940) early in the twentieth century, his first known recorder performance being in 1900, accompanying a production of Hamlet.
While Arnold Dolmetsch had brought the recorder into the light, after more than a century of oblivion in England, Edgar Hunt was the main protagonist of the school recorder movement and it was Hunt, in collaboration with the music retailers, Schott & Co, who made available the first plastic recorders in 1939, thus beginning the process by which the recorder would become one of the world's most widely played instruments.
Arnold Dolmetsch apparently had been angry at the advent of the early plastic recorders.
4) Arnold Dolmetsch, The Interpretation of the Music of the XVIIth and XVIIIth Centuries, Novello & Co, London, 1915, 457.
47) The two recorder makers were Arnold Dolmetsch and Oskar Dawson, who had learned the craft from Dolmetsch.
Like Arnold Dolmetsch, who shared his lack of academic credentials, Grainger mistrusted musicology and its practitioners, although he never approached the older man's paranoia and remained willing to learn if, as in the case of Hughes, he admired his teacher.
1 Writing on the early music revival has tended either to concentrate on Grainger's association with Arnold Dolmetsch (see, for example, Harry Haskell, The Early Music Revival: a History, London, 1988, pp.
In Otterstedt's case, the question is exacerbated by her frank and repeated reliance on the work of those same older generations, in particular, the pioneering work of Arnold Dolmetsch.
Listeners most familiar with the digital recordings of historically informed performances by Philippe Herreweghe, Ton Koopman, or John Eliot Gardiner will be intrigued by interpretations of Alfred Cortot, Adolf Busch, and Arnold Dolmetsch.
Pinto is generous in his praise for Murray Lefkowitz and also for Arnold Dolmetsch, who is not always given due credit for his pioneering work of many kinds, and who was an enthusiastic proponent of Lawes.