Inhibitor

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Related to Aromatase inhibitors: tamoxifen

inhibitor

[in′hib·əd·ər]
(aerospace engineering)
A substance bonded, taped, or dip-dried onto a solid propellant to restrict the burning surface and to give direction to the burning process.
(chemistry)
A substance which is capable of stopping or retarding a chemical reaction; to be technically useful, it must be effective in low concentration.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Inhibitor

 

a circuit having m + n inputs and a single output, at which a signal can appear only when there are no signals on the m inputs (inhibiting). The other n inputs (principal) form one of the two logic connections, “AND” or “OR.” Inhibitors are used extensively in computers. They are very often understood to be a circuit having a single principal input and a single inhibiting input. A signal appears at the output of such a circuit when a signal is present on the principal input but there is none on the inhibiting input. Such an inhibitor is called an anticoincidence gate; its conventional representation is given in Figure 1.

Figure 1. Block diagram of an anticoincidence gate (inhibitor) with m — 1 and n 1:(A) principal input, (Q) inhibiting input, (Ga) anticoincidence gate

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

inhibitor

A substance added to paint to retard drying, skinning, mildew growth, etc. Also see corrosion inhibitor, inhibiting pigment, drying inhibitor.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Side effects of aromatase inhibitors resemble those of tamoxifen side effects19 which include vasodilatation, sweating, obesity, dryness of vaginal mucosa, vulvovaginitis, leucorrhea, urinary tract infection, osteoporosis, osteopenia, arthritis and arthralgia, bone pain, pharyngitis, paraesthesia, anxiety, depression, reduced intellectual function, mood swings, headache, rash, hypertension, insomnia, back pain, lymphoedema, peripheral edema, cold sweats, dizziness, gastrointestinal disorders like nausea, dyspepsia, abdominal pain, constipation, diarrhea, asthenia, fracture, hypercholesteremia, infections, dyspnea, coughing, chest pain, flu syndrome20.
Aromatase inhibitor, Carp (Cyprinus carpio), Letrozole, Endocrine disruption, Gonadal differentiation-related genes.
Aromatase inhibitors for female infertility: a systematic review of the literature.
The present investigation was designed to better understand the aromatase based sex determination in fish using two functional treatments of tamoxifen (11p-hydroxyandrostenedione) an estrogen receptor blocker and letrozole (Cyp19) which is a known aromatase inhibitor.
Rheumatoid arthritis and aromatase inhibitors. Joint Bone Spine 2011;78:62-4.
Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) profoundly lower circulating oestrogen levels by inhibiting the conversion of androgen to oestrogen, predisposing them to increased bone loss and fracture risk [3-5] while tamoxifen has a protective effect on bone loss in postmenopausal women, but all other studies consistently show that AIs are associated with superior disease control compared with tamoxifen.
In the present study, masculinization of undifferentiated yellow catfish was induced by administration of the aromatase inhibitor (AI) letrozol (LZ).
Method: In this phase 3, randomized trial, we compared everolimus and exemestane versus exemestane and placebo (randomly assigned in a 2:1 ratio) in 724 patients with hormone-receptor-positive advanced breast cancer who had recurrence or progression while receiving previous therapy with a nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor in the adjuvant setting or to treat advanced disease (or both).
To circumvent this, we used hippocampal organotypic cultures treated with the aromatase inhibitor, letrozole.
Red wine apparently mimics the effects of aromatase inhibitors, which play a key role in managing estrogen levels.
Use of aromatase inhibitors to treat endometriosis-related pain symptoms: a systematic review.
Keywords: Aromatase inhibitors, CA Ovary, Granulosa cell tumour, Anastrozole, Oncology Royal Hospital.