aromatic amine

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aromatic amine

[¦ar·ə¦mad·ik ′am‚ēn]
(organic chemistry)
An organic compound that contains one or more amino groups joined to an aromatic structure.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The selection of aromatic amines was based on the type of diisocyanates used to produce PU adhesives.
As the zeolites exhibited effective catalytic activity to the methylation reaction of some aromatic amines [16, 17, 22-24], several different zeolites such as H[beta], H-ZSM-5, NaX, NaY, and MCM-41 were chosen to catalyze the reaction of MDA with DMC in order to obtain MBDMA, as shown in Table 1.
The range of oxidizable substrates is broad and includes pentachlorophenol, 2,6-dimethoxyphenol aromatic amines and other easily oxidizable aromatic compounds, as well as azo dyes (10, 11).
Magtoxin and phostoxin pellets react with moisture from the air to release phosphine gas, which is a highly toxic aromatic amine with health effects such as malaise, tinnitus, pulmonary edema, cyanosis, syncope, and even death with extensive exposure (U.S.
Cooking of red meat or processed meat also produces heterocyclic aromatic amines as well as other chemicals including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, which are also found in other foods and in air pollution.
The high temperatures of pan frying, grilling and broiling can produce heterocyclic aromatic amines (also found in tobacco smoke), which damage DNA.
Since the adhesives are based on aliphatic isocyanate starting materials they do not require testing for primary aromatic amines. With just one system for the inner and outer layer and with a high percentage of solid content of up to 40 per cent, both combinations reduce the consumption of ethyl acetate while granting best wetting properties and high filling good resistance.
Primary aromatic amines Possible legislation changes and impact for adhesives
It is interesting to note that the list of substances contains 7 heavy metals (entries 1-7) and 15 organic substances, including 5 phthalates (entries 8, 9 and12-14), formaldehyde, primary aromatic amines and vinyl chloride.
Other researchers have also reported that negligible etherification reactions occurred in stoichiometric blends of epoxy and aromatic amines when treated thermally at or below 200[degrees]C [48].
According to reports, certain types of azo dyes can break down to form "aromatic amines" when there is prolonged contact with the skin.