Arras, Treaty of

Arras, Treaty of.

1 Treaty of 1435, between King Charles VIICharles VII
(Charles the Well Served), 1403–61, king of France (1422–61), son and successor of Charles VI. His reign saw the end of the Hundred Years War. Although excluded from the throne by the Treaty of Troyes, Charles took the royal title after his father's death
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 of France and Duke Philip the GoodPhilip the Good,
1396–1467, duke of Burgundy (1419–67); son of Duke John the Fearless. After his father was murdered (1419) at a meeting with the dauphin (later King Charles VII of France), Philip formed an alliance with King Henry V of England.
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 of Burgundy. Through it, France and Burgundy became reconciled. Philip deserted his English allies and recognized Charles as king of France. In return, Philip received the Somme towns and was exempted from homage to the crown. Charles also agreed to punish the murderers of Philip's father, Duke John of Burgundy. 2 Treaty of 1482, between King Louis XILouis XI,
1423–83, king of France (1461–83), son and successor of Charles VII. Early Life

As dauphin Louis was almost constantly in revolt against his father.
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 of France and the local governments of the Netherlands, following the death of Mary of BurgundyMary of Burgundy,
1457–82, wife of Maximilian of Austria (later Holy Roman Emperor Maximilian I), daughter and heiress of Charles the Bold of Burgundy. The marriage of Mary was a major event in European history, for it established the Hapsburgs in the Low Countries and
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. In 1483 Mary's widower, Archduke Maximilian of Austria (later Holy Roman Emperor Maximilian IMaximilian I,
1459–1519, Holy Roman emperor and German king (1493–1519), son and successor of Holy Roman Emperor Frederick III. As emperor, he aspired to restore forceful imperial leadership and inaugurate much-needed administrative reforms in the increasingly
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), reluctantly accepted the treaty. The acquisition of Burgundy by France was recognized. Maximilian's infant daughter, Margaret of AustriaMargaret of Austria,
1480–1530, Hapsburg princess, regent of the Netherlands; daughter of Emperor Maximilian I. She was betrothed (1483) to the dauphin of France, later King Charles VIII, and was transferred to the guardianship of Louis XI of France (see Arras, Treaty of,
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, was to marry the dauphin (later King Charles VIII), bringing Artois and Franche-Comté as dowry. Maximilian's infant son (later King Philip IPhilip I
(Philip the Handsome), 1478–1506, Spanish king of Castile (1506), archduke of Austria, titular duke of Burgundy, son of Holy Roman Emperor Maximilian I and Mary of Burgundy.
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 of Castile) was to do homage for Flanders to France. When Charles VIII married Anne of BrittanyAnne of Brittany,
1477–1514, queen of France as consort of Charles VIII from 1491 to 1498 and consort of Louis XII from 1499 until her death. The daughter of Duke Francis II of Brittany, she was heiress to his duchy.
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, Maximilian forced him to restore Margaret's dowry by the Treaty of Senlis (1493).
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