Array Theory

Array Theory

(theory)
A theory developed by Trenchard More Jr. and used as the basis for the NIAL language.

Papers are available from the IBM Cambridge Scientific Center, Cambridge MA.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Note that the first term in (5) is simply the conventional array factor seen in the array theory. The last term is of significance since it shows that the radiation beampattern of the array depends on both the range and frequency increment.
Kummer, "Basic array theory," Proceedings of the IEEE, vol.
The previously mentioned (1) and (2) are the classical picture of antenna array theory, where the resulting array factor is a function of [theta] and [phi] only.
De Natale, "Planar antenna array control with genetic algorithms and adaptive array theory," IEEE Trans.
As expected by the array theory, Figure 8 shows that the main beam amplitude decreases when moving away from the broadside direction.
With this rather broad scope, the course is valuable both for those interested in phased array theory and technology itself and also for the system engineer, project manager and radar operator concerned with both benign and electronically hostile conditions.
Array theory shows that to avoid ripples in the pattern at the test area the elements must be closer to each other to approximate the pattern of an isotropic radiator.
Mailloux, "Phased Array Theory and Technology," Proc.
In simplest terms, array theory works on the principle that each antenna element is treated as an individual isotropic point source.
The corresponding far-field pattern along the array plane, illustrated in Figure 9, shows a main lobe properly pointing at an angle approximately equals 5[degrees], as imposed by the array theory [15].