arrow of time


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arrow of time

[¦ar·ō əv ′tīm]
(physiology)
The uniform and unique direction associated with the apparent inevitable flow of time into the future.
References in periodicals archive ?
The changes we notice over the years vividly illustrate science'sCi "arrow of time" -- the likely progression from order to disorder.
Dr Gordey Lesovik, lead researcher and head of the Laboratory of the Physics of Quantum Information at the Moscow Institute of Physics & Technology (MIPT), said: "We have artificially created a state that evolves in a direction opposite to that of the thermodynamic arrow of time."
He discusses the connection between correlation and basic observables in the universe; the link between correlation and differentiation; basic characteristics of the ordering process and how they work together; how these schools of thought apply to emergence and hierarchy theories; complexity, causation, and the "arrow of time"; the nature of the life process and where humans fit into it; and challenges facing humans, including future energy supply and globalization, and the ethics needed to deal with them.
The origin of the arrow of time is already described in the process of decoherence.
If we considered radioactivity (in which the time reversal symmetry is broken) then a direction of decaying vacuum is in accordance with the thermodynamical arrow of time. First, note that it is in some sense very natural that the dynamics of the Universe is in fact irreversible when the full quantum evolution is taken into account.
Philosophers and scientists often call the passing of time, the arrow of time.
There is a straw of hope however; in an accompanying comment Mrs May shows that she (if not the coterie of Brexiters in her party) has finally begun to understand that the arrow of time moves in only one direction; forwards.
It is only in the increase of entropy from the Second Law of Thermodynamics where an arrow of time becomes apparent.
All I know is that on that final evening on Costa Rica's Gulf of Nicoya, the famous "arrow of time" seemed to denote not so much direction as speed, as in a shooting arrow.
You'd think nearly 1,600 years later, we'd know better, but despite our best efforts, we haven't gone beyond witticisms like "time is what happens when nothing else does." We still can't define what time is, we still don't know what gives direction to the arrow of time, and we have no idea if the flow of time from the past to the present to the future is something that is highly subjective or an essential quality of reality.
Why does there appear to be an arrow of time? Do humans play a special role in the world?
There is a distinct arrow of time pointing in one direction.