arrowhead

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arrowhead,

any plant of the genus Sagittaria, widely distributed marsh or aquatic herbs of the primitive family Alismataceae (water-plantain family). The name derives from the arrowhead-shaped leaves of many species. Native North Americans prepared a potatolike food by roasting or broiling the tubers, particularly of S. latifolia; another species has long been cultivated in China for its starchy root. Arrowheads, which have white, buttercuplike flowers, are often grown in aquariums, ponds, and bog gardens. Arrowheads are classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Liliopsida, order Alismatales, family Alismataceae.
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arrowhead

[′a·rō‚hed]
(archeology)
The pointed or barbed tip (made of stone, bone, metal, or other material) of an arrow, often present at various sites of prehistoric peoples. Also known as arrowpoint.
(botany)
Any aquatic plant of the genus Sagitarria (water plantain family) that has arrowhead-shaped leaves and white flowers.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

arrowhead

any aquatic herbaceous plant of the genus Sagittaria, esp S. sagittifolia, having arrow-shaped aerial leaves and linear submerged leaves: family Alismataceae
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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